Durham University

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English landholding in Ireland, c1200-c1360

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project can be located within several overlapping historiographical contexts, which have shown a capacity to enlarge our understanding. These include the interactions between 'core' and 'peripheral' areas of Europe; the complex relationships between the countries and regions of the British Isles; and the ubiquitous debates about colonization, cultural transfer, and the formation of identities, in which medievalists have increasingly been involved. Studies of elites and landholding are fundamental to an understanding of such issues.

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CASSS Digital Archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (CASSS) is a project to identify, record and publish in a consistent format, the earliest English sculpture dating from the 7th to the 11th centuries. Much of this material was unpublished before the work began, but it is of crucial importance as pointing to the earliest settlements and artistic achievements of the Anglo-Saxon/Pre-Norman English. It ranges from our earliest Christian field monuments (free-standing carved crosses), and innovative decorative elements and furnishings of churches, to humble grave-markers.

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The corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this project is to publish catalogues of all the Anglo-Saxon carved stones, fully illustrated by high quality photographs, with general discussions concerning their relationships and significance, and full bibliographic references. Initially the regional volumes are published by the British Academy, but when the volumes are no longer in the Academy list they are published in shortened form on the internet. The digitized photographs are curated by the ADS (York).

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Durham Liber Vitae: A Digital Analysis, Interlinked Texts, Images and Research

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Durham Liber Vitae is a complex manuscript which originated in the mid-ninth-century as a list of several hundred names of persons associated with a Northumbrian church, probably Lindisfarne, but possibly around Monkwearmouth/Jarrow. Around 1100 AD, additions were made to the list, principally of monks of Durham Cathedral Priory, continued until and these additions continued until the 16th century. Several thousand names of lay persons were added throughout the middle ages.

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An Imperial Frontier and its Landscape: the Gorgan and Tammisha Walls in North-East Iran

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

A primary aim of the project is to employ modern archaeological techniques to date this 195 km long baked brick wall and place it within its landscape context. Although ostensibly to protect the inhabited lands of NE Iran from the incursion of nomadic groups from the central Asian steppe, there is clearly more to this wall than meets the eye. Discoveries by our Iranian colleagues, now confirmed by fieldwork in 2005, demonstrate that the wall is associated with a massive system of water supply consisting of earthen dams and canals.

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The body and mask in ancient theatre space

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project applies advanced 3 dimensional technologies to study the practice of ancient mask theatre. It produces 3D scans of Greek and Roman mask miniatures relating both to comedy and tragedy, and reproduces them at life-size by rapid prototyping. The project use 3D motion capture as well as ChromaKey technologies to record experimentation with these masks practitioners of Asiatic and European traditions, and situates the results in 3D modelled reserarch based ancient theatre spaces.
Aims and Objectives:

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19th Century Pamphlets Online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of the project was to provide researchers, teachers and learners with online access to significant collections of 19th century pamphlets held within UK research libraries. The project drew on the pamphlet holdings of seven research libraries (Bristol, Durham, Liverpool, LSE, Manchester, Newcastle and UCL), choosing collections that focused on the political, social and economic issues of the day.

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Post-Colonial Negotiations: Visualising the Franco-Algerian Relationship in the Post-War Period

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project will consider how colonial and post-colonial relations between France and Algeria have been represented since the outbreak of the Algerian War (1954-62), and will track the shifting way in which the idea or myth of 'Algeria' has been constructed, portrayed and understood in France during that time. The results will be disseminated through the blog and multi-media postcards as well as academic outputs.

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The Complete Works of James Shirley (1596-1666) (Editorial Project)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Complete Works of James Shirley will be a corpus of around 50 works, including plays, poems, and prose. James Shirley was an innovative dramatist specializing in tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, masque, pastoral, entertainment, morality, and neo-miracle, Shirley wrote for a wide variety of theatres, ranging from the Blackfriars to the first public playhouse in Dublin, but he also composed poems and grammars. Although Shirley was arguably the most significant dramatic writer of the late English Renaissance, and his complete works have never been edited.

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Breaking through rock art recording: three dimensional laser scanning of megalithic rock art

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project Breaking through rock art recording was led by Dr Diaz-Andreu(Durham University). It aims to test the novel technique of 3D laser scanning for the recording of prehistoric rock carvings. The main objectives were to assess the reliability, accuracy and precision of this technique for recording purposes and to evaluate its capacity to discover new carved motifs invisible to the naked eye.

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