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Inscriptions of Aphrodisias project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim is to publish as many as possible of the Greek inscriptions from Aphrodisias in Caria online, in order both to provide far fuller documentation than a book allows, and to meet the problems of the dissemination of expensive publications.
In so doing, we aim to develop and establish technological standards (using TEI compliant XML) which other epigraphers can use; we are trying to discuss the project with as many experts as possible, in the UK, US and Europe.

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The Canterbury Tales Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Canterbury Tales Project aims to investigate the textual tradition of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to achieve a better understanding of the history of its composition and publication before 1500. Here is how we work:

We have established a system of transcription for all the manuscripts and early printed books of the Canterbury Tales into computer-readable form.

We transcribe the manuscripts using this system.

We compare all the manuscripts, creating a record of their agreements and disagreements with a computer collation program (Collate).

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Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth.

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Integrating Digital Papyrology (IDP)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Among humanistic fields, papyrology is notably well provided with digital resources for access to primary texts, metadata, and images of the papyri, ostraca, and tablets preserved in Greek, Latin, Arabic, various forms of ancient Egyptian, and several other languages. Over the past couple of years the two most important digital papyrological projects based in North America, the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS) and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) have developed plans for integrating and sustaining the two projects.

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Inscriptions of Aphrodisias 2007

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is the first edition of the online corpus of the inscriptions of Aphrodisias recorded up to 1994. The editions, translations and commentary are by Joyce Reynolds, Charlotte Roueché and Gabriel Bodard.

Inscriptions are marked-up using the EpiDoc electronic editorial conventions developed by Tom Elliott and others. The website and the supporting materials were developed by the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London.

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Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica (IRCyr)

Posted by Paul Spence on February 25, 2015

The project aims to assemble an online corpus of all the material gathered by Prof Joyce Reynolds during her numerous visits to Libya. The project consists in the digitisation of some 2000 inscriptions from Roman Cyrenaica, nearly a third of which have never previously been published. The new corpus will be presented as a series of documents; but it will also link to an online map of Roman Cyrenaica, being prepared as part of the Pleiades project (http://www.unc.edu/awmc/pleiades.html).