Swansea University

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Mapping Medieval Chester

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project asks questions about Chester as a city on the (often troubled) border between England and Wales, and about how different medieval inhabitants imagined and represented the urban space around them. A key aspect of the project is to integrate geographical and literary mappings of the medieval city using cartographic and textual sources and using these to understand more how about urban landscapes in the Middle Ages were interpreted and navigated by local inhabitants.

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Around 1968: Activism, Networks, Trajectories

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is a study of militants, the networks they constructed and the trajectories they followed in Europe between 1965-75. It is a collective project, undertaken by 14 historians, 7 based in the UK, 7 outside. It is based on archival work and the collection of oral testimony from a sample of networks and activists involved in them in each country.

Academic field
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A critical edition of the poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

An AHRC-funded project 2002-7 which produced a digital edition of the work of Dafydd ap Gwilym (a Welsh poet of the 14th century). The work consists of 171 poems, almost all of which survive in manuscripts between 100 and 200 years later than their original composition, and bear signs of textual corruption deriving from oral transmission. Original texts have been restored as far as possible (bearing in mind that the poet's compositions may not have had an entirely fixed form).

Academic field
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The Anglo-Norman On-line Hub

Posted by Michael Beddow on February 26, 2015

Phase 1 of the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub project (2002-2004), funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board under its Resource Enhancement Scheme, had the following aims and objectives:

to open up for on-line access significant resources that will advance research into the languages and society of medieval Britain and support university courses across a wide areas of medieval studies;

to develop, evaluate, deploy and propagate XML-based technologies that will be of service in many areas of Humanities computing worlwide.