University of Cambridge

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The Historical Study and Documentation of the Pad Gling Traditions in Bhutan

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This research project aims to undertake a historical study of the Pad gling tradition and its establishments, focusing on the three principal institutions of Pad gling reincarnations: the Pad gling gSung spruls, who are considered reincarnations of Padma Gling pa himself and were based in lHa lung in Tibet and gTam zhing in Bhutan; the lHa lung Thugs sras, who are incarnations of Padma Glingpa’s son Zla ba rGyal mtshan (b.1499); and the sGang steng sPrul sku, who are considered reincarnations of Padma Gling pa’s grandson Padma 'Phrin las (1564-1642?).

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Cambridge New Greek Lexicon Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal resource is a bilingual Dictionary, from Ancient Greek to English, designed for students of intermediate level and above. It is being composed to take account of the many new textual discoveries made since the last comparable dictionary in 1889, and to provide definitions and translations in modern English which will communicate clearly to contemporary readers. It is also being published as an online resource, so will be widely available to distance-learners.

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Early Irish Glossaries Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

An important resource for our understanding of the literary and cultural environment of medieval Ireland is a series of three inter-related early Irish glossaries, known as Sanas Cormaic ‘Cormac’s Glossary’, O’Mulconry’s Glossary, and Dúil Dromma Cetta ‘the Collection of Druim Cett’. They each consist of alphabetically listed (first letter only) headwords followed by an entry which can range from a single word explanation, often an explanation of the headword, to a whole narrative running to several pages.

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The geography of knowledge in Assyria and Babylonia, 700-200 BCE: a diachronic comparison of four scholarly libraries

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Where is knowledge generated? How does that knowledge replicate and spread? Where is it consumed? Who owns knowledge, and who may access it? Under what circumstances, and in what places, does it flourish or die out? How are its transmission and reception influenced by social and political factors? These are central questions in the history and sociology of science today.

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The complete work of Charles Darwin online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Darwin Online is by far the largest Darwin publication in history. It contains over 40,000 pages of searchable text and 130,000 electronic images. This site contains at least one exemplar of all known Darwin publications, reproduced to the highest scholarly standards, both as searchable text and electronic images of the originals.

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Scriptorium: Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts, Online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Scriptorium: Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Online is a three-year (2006-2009) AHRC-funded Resource Enhancement Project, based in the Faculty of English at the University of Cambridge.

We are constructing a digital archive of manuscript miscellanies and commonplace books from the period c. 1450-1720; our website will provide unrestricted public access to these images. We will also develop and publish a set of online pedagogical and research resources supporting late medieval and early modern manuscript studies.

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Digitisation of the South Asian oral history archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Centre of South Asian Studies won a Resource Enhancement Grant from the AHRC to begin the digitisation of its oral history collections. There are around 300 recordings in this collection, mostly held on audio cassette, with some reel-to-reel tape recordings as well. The project was completed in 2009 - the interviews, transcripts and various search functions are now available on the Centre of South Asian Studies' website.

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18th-Century Parliamentary Papers

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

During the eighteenth century the British Parliament ruled over one of the most powerful nations on earth. The matters it debated ranged from the minutely personal, such as individual divorce cases or family financial affairs, through the local, for example the construction or roads or harbours, to matters of the most central national importance, like electoral reform, wars and treaties, catholic emancipation or law and order.

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Inscriptions of Aphrodisias 2007

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is the first edition of the online corpus of the inscriptions of Aphrodisias recorded up to 1994. The editions, translations and commentary are by Joyce Reynolds, Charlotte Roueché and Gabriel Bodard.

Inscriptions are marked-up using the EpiDoc electronic editorial conventions developed by Tom Elliott and others. The website and the supporting materials were developed by the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London.

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Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth.

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