University of Cambridge

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Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia is a co-operative research project between the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit at the University of Cambridge, and the International Association for Mongol Studies in Ulaanbaatar. The project has two goals: to increase knowledge of how people’s contexts affect understandings of events and history and to construct an on-line database in Mongolian and English of the oral history of Mongolia. We seek to increase our understanding of the relationship between memory, history and people’s political, cultural, social and economic contexts.

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Microliths and Mortuary Practices: late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers and landscapes in the Azraq Basin, Jordan.

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Our work presents critical insights into the timing and nature of the first sedentary villages, early animal domestication, the role of animals in social life, prehistoric health, mortuary practices, and the first cemeteries. It also raises questions as to whether the characteristics of `Uyun al-Hammam are unique, or indicative of broad trends in Epipalaeolithic behaviour. The research aims to test these questions through a combined programme of excavation, at the sites of Kharaneh IV and Ayn Qasiyah, and analysis of archaeological evidence for behavioural change in the Epipalaeolithic.

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Sharing and Visualizing Old St. Peter's: East and West in Renaissance Rome

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project set out to examine the reception of pilgrims from Ethiopia, Armenia, Hungary and Germany in their own compounds on the south side of Old St Peter’s in the 15th century, and to explore the cultural exchange provoked by these visits. Because contacts between papal Rome and the oriental Christian communities of Ethiopia and Armenia are an almost unexplored area of scholarship, it soon became evident that these were the two nations that needed the most detailed treatment.

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World Oral Literature Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The World Oral Literature Project is an urgent global initiative to document and make accessible endangered oral literatures before they disappear without record.

Established at the University of Cambridge in 2009, the project aspires to become a permanent centre for the appreciation and preservation of oral literature and collaborate with local communities to document their own oral narratives. The World Oral Literature Project will also publish a library of oral texts and occasional papers, and make the collections accessible through new media platforms.

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Online calendar of the correspondence of Charles Darwin

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The web resource created through the AHRB-funded initiative `An online calendar of the correspondence of Charles Darwin' and launched in 2002, was based on a revised and updated edition of the printed Calendar to the Correspondence of Charles Darwin: 1821 – 1882 (Cambridge University Press, 1994), but incorporated further substantial additions and corrections. The book summarises every letter that the naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-82) was then known to have sent or received and is a standard reference work for scholars.

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Greece and Rome at the Fitzwilliam Museum

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project is a collaboration between the Fitzwilliam Museum and the Department of Classics at Cambridge to redisplay the Greek and Roman collections in the light of new research findings and scholarly approaches to the study of objects. The display will incorporate labels, panels, a map and timeline; there will also be a series of hand-held information boards for use in the gallery, which will introduce some of the underlying themes that can be pursued in various areas of the room.

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A historical corpus of the Welsh language

Posted by David Willis on February 26, 2015

The Historical Corpus of the Welsh Language 1500-1850 is a collection of Welsh texts from the period 1500-1850 in an electronic format. It is the result of a project to encode Welsh texts of the period funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB Resource Enhancement Award RE11900) in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Cambridge between 2001 and 2004. The project's Principle Investigator was David Willis, while Ingo Mittendorf was the project's Research Associate.

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1641 Depositions

Posted by Micheál Ó Siochrú on February 25, 2015

The aim of this three-year project (2007-2010) is to transcribe and digitise the ‘1641 Depositions’, a unique historical source housed in the TCD Library, The collection comprises some 3,100 personal statements, in which mainly protestant men and women of all classes told of their experiences at the outbreak of the rebellion by the catholic Irish in 1641. This material, collected by government-appointed commissioners over the course of a decade, runs to approximately 19,000 pages.

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Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica (IRCyr)

Posted by Paul Spence on February 25, 2015

The project aims to assemble an online corpus of all the material gathered by Prof Joyce Reynolds during her numerous visits to Libya. The project consists in the digitisation of some 2000 inscriptions from Roman Cyrenaica, nearly a third of which have never previously been published. The new corpus will be presented as a series of documents; but it will also link to an online map of Roman Cyrenaica, being prepared as part of the Pleiades project (http://www.unc.edu/awmc/pleiades.html).

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