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Reassessing ancient Egyptian crops, crop husbandry and the agrarian landscape

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The main focus of the project is to provide a well-integrated reassessment of the diversity, distribution and use of Egyptian crops, crop husbandry and the agrarian landscape through the systematic compilation and analysis of Egyptian archaeobotanical data which will also be integrated with the textual, artistic and ethnohistorical evidence for crops and other species in order to create a more powerful methodology for understanding the complex processes of ancient Egyptian agriculture than the use of any single source of evidence alone.

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Fontes Anglo-Saxonici

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Fontes Anglo-Saxonici: A Register of Written Sources Used by Authors in Anglo-Saxon England is intended to identify all written sources which were incorporated, quoted, translated or adapted anywhere in English or Latin texts which were written in Anglo-Saxon England (i.e. England to 1066), or by Anglo-Saxons in other countries.

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Law and Empire, AD 193-455: the Projet Volterra (2)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The general aims of the Projet Volterra (named, in association with the École Française de Rome, in honour of Edoardo Volterra (1904-1987), the distinguished scholar of Roman Law) are to promote the study of Roman legislation in its full social, political and legal context, and its continuing tradition. The area of Roman imperial legal pronouncements was identified as one in which current scholarship was less than adequately served in terms of Regesten, repertoria and bibliographical aids.

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The Bentham Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Bentham Project, part of UCL's Faculty of Laws, is preparing a new authoritative edition of The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham, which is being published by Oxford University Press. The twenty-sixth volume to be published will appear in 2005. It is anticipated that, when complete, the edition will run to sixty-eight volumes. Each volume contains an Editorial Introduction, full annotation, and comprehensive name and subject indexes.

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English Monastic Archives: Access and Analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aims to provide a powerful tool for research on medieval English history by analysing documents generated by English monasteries with the help of databases. The questions the project addressed are: What properties (manors, churches and chapels) did each monastery own? How many monastic properties can be found in each county, and which houses, of which orders, owned them? What genres of documents did monasteries produce? How many documents in each genre have survived? Where are they to be found? How many documents of each type did each individual monastery produce?

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Spatial and chronological patterns in the "Neolithisation" of Europe

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The nature of the processes by which the economic and cultural elements commonly characterised as 'Neolithic' spread across Europe in the period following 7000 BC has been much debated in recent years. In order to distinguish the various processes responsible, it is necessary to identify those elements which are present in each area and to date them accurately, not least in relation to the latest dates for the local Mesolithic.

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The Lexicon of Festus: text, translation and full scholarly commentary

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The Lexicon of Festus (de uerborum significatu) is a Latin dictionary compiled in the Roman imperial period which preserves a great deal of priceless information about the history, society, religion and topography of Rome and Italy in earlier centuries. It draws on a rich series of studies by the writers of Cicero's day, who collected and analysed information about the traditions of their past and the institutions of their own day, which they believed were in a state of serious decay.

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