University of Exeter

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British town maps, 1470-1895: a catalogue and cartographical analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim was to produce for England, Wales and Scotland a catalogue of the cartographic characteristics and topographic content of every manuscript and printed town map produced from 1470 (the first British town map) to 1895 (by which time publication of Ordnance Survey large-scale town maps was completed). The catalogue will constitute a definitive, permanent research tool for a wide range of historical research users. This last will contribute to the long-term conservation of these, often fragile, artefacts.

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Early Stuart Libels: an electronic edition of political poems from manuscript sources

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

“Early Stuart Libels” is a web-based edition of early seventeenth-century political poetry from manuscript sources. It brings into the public domain over 350 poems, many of which have never before been published. Though most of the texts are poems of satire and invective, others take the form of anti-libels, responding to libellers with orthodox panegyric. These poems throw new light on literary and political culture Early Stuart Libels: an edition of poetry from manuscript sources. Ed. Alastair Bellany and Andrew McRae with the assistance of Paul E.J. Hammer and Michelle O'Callaghan.

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Citation and Allusion in the Ars nova French Chanson and Motet: Memory, Tradition, and Innovation

Posted by Gary Stringer on March 29, 2015

This project undertakes the first detailed study of citation and allusion in the period c1340-1420 as expressed in the two genres at the cutting edge of musical style at the time, the motet and the chanson. Medieval composers had always demonstrated a readiness to exploit existing material in their creation of new works, nowhere more conspicuously than in the 13th-century motet.

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Philosophical issues in genomics: an annotated bibliographic database of scientific literature

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Contemporary molecular biology – often conducted under the banner of genomics – has the potential to transform our understanding of issues such as the origins and history of life, human nature and biodiversity. It is also transforming the way biological science is practised, a process that is both interesting in its own right and potentially a great source of insight into the nature of scientific change and the relationships between science and society.

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Around 1968: Activism, Networks, Trajectories

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is a study of militants, the networks they constructed and the trajectories they followed in Europe between 1965-75. It is a collective project, undertaken by 14 historians, 7 based in the UK, 7 outside. It is based on archival work and the collection of oral testimony from a sample of networks and activists involved in them in each country.

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Modelling Urban Renewal and Growth in Britain and North-West Europe, AD 800-1300: The Wallingford Burh to Borough Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Wallingford is a highly important yet vastly understudied historic small town, sited alongside the Thames and offering strong topographic survivals of early and full medieval date. By analysing the rich archaeological and documentary data (actual, visible and buried) for Wallingford between c.

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Connecting Cornwall: Telecommunications, Locality and Work in West Britain 1870-1918

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Cornwall has a number of significant historical communications sites starting with Porthcurno and ranging over early radio sites at Poldhu and the Lizard to Land’s End and Bodmin Radio and the Satellite station at Goonhilly. The ‘Connecting Cornwall’ project will be using the Cable and Wireless historic archive to develop new research into the communications industry in Cornwall with an emphasis on the Eastern Telegraph Company in the first instance.