University of York

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Medieval Petitions: A catalogue of the 'Ancient Petitions' in the Public Record Office

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The series know as 'Ancient Petitions' in The National Archives: Public Record Office consists of 17,629 petitions presented to the English crown between the thirteenth and the fifteenth centuries, written in Anglo-Norman French, Latin and Middle English. They provide a wealth of unexploited data on the political, legal, social, cultural and biographical history of later medieval England and of its dependencies.

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Joining Tracks: enhancing academic access to the National Railway Museum Library

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The National Railway Museum is one of the leading museums of transport and mobility in the world. Through its Institute of Railway Studies & Transport History, managed and funded jointly with the University of York, it has in the last 10 years developed an international reputation for the academic study of the history of railways in the United Kingdom and overseas. In order to maximise the academic use of the NRM's collections, this project aims:

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Predicting the location of hominid sites in Africa and Asia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Early human archaeological and fossil sites are known in Africa from about 6 million years ago, and in Asia from about 1.8 million years ago. The distribution of these sites in time and space is very patchy, and while this situation may in part be the result of the practical difficulties of working in these regions, it is also likely that given the variables of geomorphology, climate and vegetation, sites in which hominin, faunal, archaeological or environmental information is preserved may not be distributed uniformly across the landscape.

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The Parsed Corpus of Early English Correspondence

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Parsed Corpus of Early English Correspondence is a syntactically-annotated version of 2.2 million words of the Corpus of Early English Correspondece (created by the Sociolinguistics and Language History project team at the Department of English, University of Helsinki). It includes 84 letter collections, consisting of 4790 letters dating from 1410 to 1695. The corpus is annotated with the grammatical and sociolinguistic information necessary for extensive (socio-)linguistic analysis.

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The York-Toronto-Helsinki Parsed Corpus of Old English Prose

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The York-Toronto-Helsinki Parsed Corpus of Old English Prose is a 1.5 million word electronic corpus of Old English prose texts which is annotated with the grammatical information necessary for extensive linguistic analysis. The corpus can be searched automatically for abstract grammatical structures (such as relative clauses, subject-verb inversion, expletive subjects, etc.), as well as (strings of) words, allowing quick and easy access to the data necessary to investigate virtually any aspect of the language of the period.

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Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi (Phase II: Enhancing Stained Glass Studies)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi (CVMA) is an international survey of stained glass. CVMA in Great Britain has so far published one hundred printed volumes to date in addition to the online publications which include a substantial image archive; a prototype digital publication of the stained glass in Norfolk; and an online magazine called 'Vidimus' (available at http://vidimus.org).

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English Episcopal Acta

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's purpose is to edit and publish copies of all English episcopal acta - that is, bishops’ charters and documents - from 1066 to 1300 or until the beginning of bishops’ registers in each diocese; and to make them available both in print and electronically.

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Archaeotools: Data mining, facetted classification and E-archaeology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This two year project built upon previous ADS work to develop tools (the Common Information Environment - Archaeobrowser project) using advanced data mining and knowledge capture technologies to allow archaeologists to discover, share and analyse datasets and legacy publications that had hitherto been very difficult to integrate into digital frameworks. The project had three interrelated objectives, each represented by a distinct workpackage.

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