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The St Alban's Psalter: on the Web

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

To digitise the St Albans Psalter and place it on the web. The images are accompanied by complete transcription, translation (Latin into both English and German). Each image has a page-by-page commentary, and the manuscript is amplified by about 40,000 words of accompanying essays.
Aims: to make the psalter available in colour.
Research questions: to understand how the manuscript was made, when, for whom, and why the range of images were chosen.

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British Fiction, 1800-1829: A Database of Production, Circulation and Reception History

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation & Reception (DBF) arises from more than fifteen years’ general research into Romantic-era British fiction, by the project director, Professor Peter Garside. The project provides a comprehensive bibliographical record of the production of fiction during the first three decades of the nineteenth century, supplemented by a variety of contextual secondary materials drawn from the period.

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Cataloguing the Papers of Wilfred Ward (1856-1916)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Papers of the Roman Catholic Modernist movement held in St Andrews University Library are of central importance to the study of Roman Catholic theology in the late nineteenth and early 20th century. Amongst the group, the papers of Wilfrid Ward (1856-1916) are of great importance. Prior to this project, they were the only element of the broader collection which did not benefit from internet-deliverable detailed listing.

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The British archaeological expedition to the ancient emporium at Vetren-Pistiros, central Bulgaria

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project consists of preliminary geophysical prospection (1999-2001), a programme of limited excavation (30 sq metres), accompanied by faunal, organic, and metallurgical analyses (1999-2008), whose aim is to create a continuous, dated sequence of activities at the late Iron Age river port at Adjiyska Vodenitsa, near Vetren, plausibly identified with ancient Pistiros.

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Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project is investigating human activity across the landscape during all time periods, using intensive archaeological and geomorphological survey. TAESP is working in a broad area of the north-central Troodos mountains that includes fertile valleys and plains, copper-bearing foothills, and the northern part of the Troodos Range itself. Other than some rescue excavation of tombs, no systematic archaeological work had been done in this area, and none at all in the mountains.

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The Medieval Palace of Westminster Research Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Overview of the Project. The Westminster Palace Research Project is an inter-disciplinary study, combining archaeology, history, architectural history, and new uses of information technology. Its aim is to produce a comprehensive architectural study of the medieval palace and its place in the broader context of historic palaces. Equally important is the fact that the innovative techniques to be used will be transferable to the study of other historic buildings, and thus the project has implications beyond Westminster.

Academic field
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Acta of King Henry I

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aims to create a critical edition of the acta of King Henry I of England, and so provide a fundamental research tool for the history of the central middle ages whose absence has been lamented for decades past. The edition will integrate with the texts the contextual information on government and local affairs essential to the interpretation of the documents, and will provide a diplomatic analysis of the acta illuminating their form and use. It will therefore allow more informed and sophisticated use of the texts by non-specialists than has previously been possible.

Academic field
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Predicting the location of hominid sites in Africa and Asia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Early human archaeological and fossil sites are known in Africa from about 6 million years ago, and in Asia from about 1.8 million years ago. The distribution of these sites in time and space is very patchy, and while this situation may in part be the result of the practical difficulties of working in these regions, it is also likely that given the variables of geomorphology, climate and vegetation, sites in which hominin, faunal, archaeological or environmental information is preserved may not be distributed uniformly across the landscape.

Academic field

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