Archaeology

section icon

The Baltic Ceramic Market c. 1200-1600: Hanseatic Trade and Cultural Exchange

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This study concerns an analysis of multivariate data collected during an archaeological survey of the Hanseatic ceramic market in the Baltic between c. 1200 and 1600. The archaeological distribution of imported ceramic wares forms not only a measure of commercial and technological exchange between western Europe and Scandinavia, Fennoscandia and the eastern Baltic region but also of the spread of Hanseatic domestic practices to communities living on the very edge of the European cultural orbit, particularly in the spheres of dining ritual, heating technology and interior decoration.

Academic field
section icon

Urban waterfront geoarchaeology in the Netherlands and the UK: a comparison

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The objectives of the project were:
1. To test the applicability of models of urban (waterfront) site formation and post-depositional modification developed in the UK in a wider north-west European context. If the models are applicable, to use them to interpret urban waterfront sequences in Utrecht, if not to produce new models for the town and other Dutch cities.
2. To establish relationships with Dutch colleagues which will enable both parties to develop their research in urban archaeology/geoarchaeology in a more informed manner.

Academic field
section icon

Christianisation and state-formation in Northern and Central Europe c.900-c.1200

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

We analysed the connection between religious change (Christianisation) and political change (the development of centralised power) in Scandinavia, Central Europe and Rus'. In all these areas the final conversion to Christianity was initiated from above. Yet there were also significant differences between the regions in how Christianisation and monarchy were linked. We composed a detailed questionnaire and included history, archaeology and art history in our analysis. Our aims were to compare the various areas, looking at both the primary sources and the national literature.

Academic field
section icon

ICTGuides

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The ICTGuides project is now incorporated within this project (arts-humanities.net).

Two developments gave birth to the ICTGuides database: an increase in the use of ICT in arts and humanities research and an awareness that information on how ICT is used in arts-humanities research is not readily available online. The resulting disparity was largely seen to have detrimental effects on ICT-based scholarship as sharing computational expertise among scholars is a precursor to promoting innovation within the field.

section icon

Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project is investigating human activity across the landscape during all time periods, using intensive archaeological and geomorphological survey. TAESP is working in a broad area of the north-central Troodos mountains that includes fertile valleys and plains, copper-bearing foothills, and the northern part of the Troodos Range itself. Other than some rescue excavation of tombs, no systematic archaeological work had been done in this area, and none at all in the mountains.

section icon

Silchester insula IX

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's aim is the capture, storage and manipulation of data from a long-term archaeological excavation (1997 and continuing) of insula ix of the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester, Hampshire (Calleva Atrebatum). The data comprise a variety of linked excavation and finds records which are stored on the Integrated Archaeological Database (IADB). The latter is a key tool for the post-excavation analysis of this complex, stratified site for which publication is planned in both printed and web-based formats.

Academic field
section icon

Predicting the location of hominid sites in Africa and Asia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Early human archaeological and fossil sites are known in Africa from about 6 million years ago, and in Asia from about 1.8 million years ago. The distribution of these sites in time and space is very patchy, and while this situation may in part be the result of the practical difficulties of working in these regions, it is also likely that given the variables of geomorphology, climate and vegetation, sites in which hominin, faunal, archaeological or environmental information is preserved may not be distributed uniformly across the landscape.

Academic field
section icon

South Cadbury Environs Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project is a multiperiod survey of the landscape within a 64 sq km centred on the Iron Age and Post Roman hillfort of Cadbury Castle, Somerset. Sampling localities and transects cover approximately 11 sq km of the study area.
The principal survey techniques have been gradiometry, test and shovel pitting, the first two applied uniformly over all target areas, the latter were soil conditions are suitable. Excavation is then used to test the results and to further the narrative objectives.

Academic field
section icon

Inscriptions of Aphrodisias project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim is to publish as many as possible of the Greek inscriptions from Aphrodisias in Caria online, in order both to provide far fuller documentation than a book allows, and to meet the problems of the dissemination of expensive publications.
In so doing, we aim to develop and establish technological standards (using TEI compliant XML) which other epigraphers can use; we are trying to discuss the project with as many experts as possible, in the UK, US and Europe.

Pages