Archaeology

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The Pompey Project: the evolution, structure and legacy of the Theatre of Pompey

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The first scientific study of Rome’s first permanent theatre. Comprehensive documentation of all surviving remains, supplemented by new limited excavation at specific points targeted by our initial analysis. Creation of a definitive series of site-plans, sections, elevations keyed to a complete photographic record, and measured drawings. We have prepared an extensive archaeological register recording the details of every known artefact discovered on the site of the theatre complex for the past five centuries.

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The Vindolanda writing -tablets: edition with commentary and electronic database

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal aim of the project was to offer a complete electronic publication of the Latin writing-tablets from Vindolanda published by A.K.Bowman and J.D.Thomas in Tabulae Vindolandenses I-II (1983 and 1994), supplemented by the addenda and corrigenda from volume III (2003). The publication includes all text and commentaries, together with a full photographic record and accompanying historical and archaeological essays.

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Lower Palaeolithic technology, raw material and population ecology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"This visual and metric database is the data component of a project funded by a major grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Board between 1999 and 2001. The project was designed to examine Lower Palaeolithic technology and raw material and to use the findings to discuss aspects of population ecology during the period. The time range is from 1.5Myr to 300Kyr and includes material from Africa, Europe and the Near East. The database contains 10668 digitised images of 3556 bifaces, as well as information on provenience, raw material and standard measurements.

Academic field
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Urban connectivity in Iron-Age and Roman Southern Spain

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Urban Connectivity in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain Project, funded by the AHRC between 2002 and 2005 with subsequent support by the University of Southampton and institutions in Seville, has been studying changing social, economic and geographical relationships between some 195 towns and nucleated settlements in central and western Baetica between c.500 BC and AD 200. The project has the following five research questions, based on data gathered in the field and through archival research between 2002 and 2008:

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The corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this project is to publish catalogues of all the Anglo-Saxon carved stones, fully illustrated by high quality photographs, with general discussions concerning their relationships and significance, and full bibliographic references. Initially the regional volumes are published by the British Academy, but when the volumes are no longer in the Academy list they are published in shortened form on the internet. The digitized photographs are curated by the ADS (York).

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Spatial and chronological patterns in the "Neolithisation" of Europe

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The nature of the processes by which the economic and cultural elements commonly characterised as 'Neolithic' spread across Europe in the period following 7000 BC has been much debated in recent years. In order to distinguish the various processes responsible, it is necessary to identify those elements which are present in each area and to date them accurately, not least in relation to the latest dates for the local Mesolithic.

Academic field
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CASSS Digital Archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (CASSS) is a project to identify, record and publish in a consistent format, the earliest English sculpture dating from the 7th to the 11th centuries. Much of this material was unpublished before the work began, but it is of crucial importance as pointing to the earliest settlements and artistic achievements of the Anglo-Saxon/Pre-Norman English. It ranges from our earliest Christian field monuments (free-standing carved crosses), and innovative decorative elements and furnishings of churches, to humble grave-markers.

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Statue of Buddha, National Museums Liverpool, UK

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"This project by Conservation Technologies, National Museums Liverpool, was concerned with recording and digital reconstruction of a 13th-century Japanese statue of Buddha in the World Museum Liverpool. The subject of this investigation was a 70cm-high wooden sculpture probably made in Japan during the Kamakura period (1185 – 1333). Painted floral decoration visible today was applied during the later Edo period (1600 – 1868). There are also other changes in the original appearance and some features are missing.

Academic field
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Reconstructing the Quseiri Arabic Documents (RQAD)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The research objective is to read or reconstruct the Arabic documents found at the harbour town of Quseir on the Egyptian Red Sea coast during the Ayyubid and Mamluk periods (13th-15th centuries)
ie:
a) to evaluate the texts combined with archeological enquiry;
b) to examine the content and context within the framework of the long distance trade and pilgrim traffic from Quesir as a chief port of the Red Sea region and its trade contacts with the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean.

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