Archaeology

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Lexicon of Greek Personal Names

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Ancient Greek names provide crucial evidence to the historian. They reveal where people came from; they show what gods were popular at a given time; they may express political ideals. The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names project traces every bearer of every name, drawing on a huge variety of evidence, from personal tombstones, dedications, works of art, to civic decrees, treaties, citizen-lists etc., as well as literature, artefacts, graffiti etc. The result: almost 400,000 ancient Greeks on record.

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Masks for Menander: imaging and enactment

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Combining experimental archaeology and practice-based research, the project has investigated the performance qualities and style of the masks of Greek New Comedy. Its aims have been to image in 3D selected New Comedy monuments from UK and European museums, and to conduct studio research with full-size reconstructions of the masks, scaled exactly from the 3-dimensional co-ordinates.

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Dynamic encoding of historical documents: people, property and rights in 18th century Corsican notaries acts

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aimed to develope and evaluate portable and transparent methods and tools based on SGML/XML for managing complex document collections. As a test case we examined patterns of co-operation and disagreement between people as expressed in legal documents of the 18th century from southern Corsica concerning rights over property. Our approach aimed to relate coding, modelling, interpretation and catalogue entries with the source material, resulting in a layered representation that includes references to as much of the research context as possible.

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The Language of Landscape: Reading the Anglo-Saxon Countryside

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The aim of the LangScape project is to make accessible over the World Wide Web a rich body of material relating to the English Countryside of a thousand years ago and more: detailed descriptions by those who lived in and worked the Anglo-Saxon landscape. The proposed resource - an electronic corpus of Anglo-Saxon boundary clauses with extensive XML mark-up - will be a powerful research tool with applications within a broad range of academic disciplines.

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Scene details in Ancient Egyptian monuments: Oxford Expedition's electronic database and publications project (c.2960 - 2040 BC).

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The resource known as the Linacre College Oxford Expedition: Scene-details Database was envisaged by its author in the early 1980s - but the opportunity to devise the initial framework and content of a database, and to undertake the academic and technical work necessary for its publication online, did not present itself until much later, in 2003.

Academic field
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Roman amphorae: a digital resource

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this website is to provide an online introductory resource for the study of Roman amphorae. In the Roman empire amphorae were pottery containers used for the non-local transport of agricultural products. Their fragments litter archaeological sites of all kinds on land and at sea and have been a subject of serious study for over 100 years.

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Stone in Archaeology: towards a digital resource

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The 'Stone in Archaeology - Towards a Digital Resource' project is based on the large archaeological comparative rock collection housed in the Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton. The main aim of the project has been to create an easily accessible, unique, multidisciplinary, searchable relational database which comprises the principal stones known to be used in antiquity throughout England.

Academic field
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The geography of knowledge in Assyria and Babylonia, 700-200 BCE: a diachronic comparison of four scholarly libraries

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Where is knowledge generated? How does that knowledge replicate and spread? Where is it consumed? Who owns knowledge, and who may access it? Under what circumstances, and in what places, does it flourish or die out? How are its transmission and reception influenced by social and political factors? These are central questions in the history and sociology of science today.

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