Archaeology

section icon

Lower Palaeolithic technology, raw material and population ecology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"This visual and metric database is the data component of a project funded by a major grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Board between 1999 and 2001. The project was designed to examine Lower Palaeolithic technology and raw material and to use the findings to discuss aspects of population ecology during the period. The time range is from 1.5Myr to 300Kyr and includes material from Africa, Europe and the Near East. The database contains 10668 digitised images of 3556 bifaces, as well as information on provenience, raw material and standard measurements.

Academic field
section icon

Urban connectivity in Iron-Age and Roman Southern Spain

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Urban Connectivity in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain Project, funded by the AHRC between 2002 and 2005 with subsequent support by the University of Southampton and institutions in Seville, has been studying changing social, economic and geographical relationships between some 195 towns and nucleated settlements in central and western Baetica between c.500 BC and AD 200. The project has the following five research questions, based on data gathered in the field and through archival research between 2002 and 2008:

section icon

Masks for Menander: imaging and enactment

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Combining experimental archaeology and practice-based research, the project has investigated the performance qualities and style of the masks of Greek New Comedy. Its aims have been to image in 3D selected New Comedy monuments from UK and European museums, and to conduct studio research with full-size reconstructions of the masks, scaled exactly from the 3-dimensional co-ordinates.

section icon

Roman amphorae: a digital resource

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this website is to provide an online introductory resource for the study of Roman amphorae. In the Roman empire amphorae were pottery containers used for the non-local transport of agricultural products. Their fragments litter archaeological sites of all kinds on land and at sea and have been a subject of serious study for over 100 years.

section icon

The Language of Landscape: Reading the Anglo-Saxon Countryside

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The aim of the LangScape project is to make accessible over the World Wide Web a rich body of material relating to the English Countryside of a thousand years ago and more: detailed descriptions by those who lived in and worked the Anglo-Saxon landscape. The proposed resource - an electronic corpus of Anglo-Saxon boundary clauses with extensive XML mark-up - will be a powerful research tool with applications within a broad range of academic disciplines.

section icon

Stone in Archaeology: towards a digital resource

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The 'Stone in Archaeology - Towards a Digital Resource' project is based on the large archaeological comparative rock collection housed in the Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton. The main aim of the project has been to create an easily accessible, unique, multidisciplinary, searchable relational database which comprises the principal stones known to be used in antiquity throughout England.

Academic field
section icon

Scene details in Ancient Egyptian monuments: Oxford Expedition's electronic database and publications project (c.2960 - 2040 BC).

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The resource known as the Linacre College Oxford Expedition: Scene-details Database was envisaged by its author in the early 1980s - but the opportunity to devise the initial framework and content of a database, and to undertake the academic and technical work necessary for its publication online, did not present itself until much later, in 2003.

Academic field
section icon

Semantic Tools for Archaeological Resources

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Increasingly within archaeology, the Web is used for dissemination of datasets. This contributes to the growing amount of information on the ‘deep web’, which a recent Bright Planet study estimated to be 500 times larger than the ‘surface web’. However Google and other web search engines are ill equipped to retrieve information from the richly structured databases that are key resources for humanities scholars. Important archaeological results and reports are also appearing as grey literature, before or instead of traditional publication.

Pages