Archaeology

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The body and mask in ancient theatre space

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project applies advanced 3 dimensional technologies to study the practice of ancient mask theatre. It produces 3D scans of Greek and Roman mask miniatures relating both to comedy and tragedy, and reproduces them at life-size by rapid prototyping. The project use 3D motion capture as well as ChromaKey technologies to record experimentation with these masks practitioners of Asiatic and European traditions, and situates the results in 3D modelled reserarch based ancient theatre spaces.
Aims and Objectives:

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Early historic landscapes and the rise of centralised states on the Mekong Delta, Cambodia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Mekong River delta region was a hearth of early state development in SE Asia. Archaeological research at the early historic city of Angkor Borei, Cambodia, is revealing the nature of the cultural landscape, but this information is yet to be articulated with records of change and variability in the ‘natural’ landscape.

Academic field
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The origin and spread of stock-keeping in the Near East and Europe

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

In western Eurasia we know that the earliest evidence for domestic farmyard animals occurs around 10,000 years ago. We also know that farming then spread westwards through Europe over the subsequent millennia, arriving in the far west and north of Europe some 6,000 years ago. For decades there have been major debates as to the nature of this spread, with many basic questions still remaining largely unanswered. The objective of this major research project, which has been funded for four years by the AHRC, is to address these questions.

Academic field
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An Imperial Frontier and its Landscape: the Gorgan and Tammisha Walls in North-East Iran

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

A primary aim of the project is to employ modern archaeological techniques to date this 195 km long baked brick wall and place it within its landscape context. Although ostensibly to protect the inhabited lands of NE Iran from the incursion of nomadic groups from the central Asian steppe, there is clearly more to this wall than meets the eye. Discoveries by our Iranian colleagues, now confirmed by fieldwork in 2005, demonstrate that the wall is associated with a massive system of water supply consisting of earthen dams and canals.

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The geography of knowledge in Assyria and Babylonia, 700-200 BCE: a diachronic comparison of four scholarly libraries

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Where is knowledge generated? How does that knowledge replicate and spread? Where is it consumed? Who owns knowledge, and who may access it? Under what circumstances, and in what places, does it flourish or die out? How are its transmission and reception influenced by social and political factors? These are central questions in the history and sociology of science today.

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Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth.

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Inscriptions of Aphrodisias 2007

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is the first edition of the online corpus of the inscriptions of Aphrodisias recorded up to 1994. The editions, translations and commentary are by Joyce Reynolds, Charlotte Roueché and Gabriel Bodard.

Inscriptions are marked-up using the EpiDoc electronic editorial conventions developed by Tom Elliott and others. The website and the supporting materials were developed by the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London.

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Stonehenge Riverside Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Stonehenge Riverside Project was initiated in 2003 with the overall aim of better understanding Stonehenge within its changing monumental and natural landscape context, especially through investigation of the hypothesis that Stonehenge (in its Phase 3) formed one half of a larger complex as a stone circle associated with the dead, in contrast to a timber circle associated with the living at Durrington Walls.

Academic field
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DARIAH: Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Supporting and enhancing digitially enabled research.

The Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) aims to develop and maintain an infrastructure in support of ICT-based research practices across the arts and humanities, acting as a trusted intermediary between disciplines and domains. DARIAH is working with communities of practice to:

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