Archaeology

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Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth.

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Linking and Querying Ancient Texts (LaQuAT)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The LaQuAT (Linking and Querying Ancient Texts) project investigated technologies for providing integrated SQL-based views of diverse data resources related to classical archaeology, specifically containing epigraphic and papyrological material. These resources were quite heterogeneous in terms of standards and structure, comprising two relational databases with different schemas, and an XML-based corpus; they are hosted by different institutions in different countries, and are the outputs of divergent research communities.

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Technologies of Enchantment: Celtic Art in Southern Britain in the Middle and Late Iron Age

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aims to investigate the artefacts found in Britain between about 300 BC and 150 AD which have come to be known as ‘Celtic Art’. The project seeks to understand why Celtic Art objects were made in the first place, how they were used and why they often seem to have been intentionally deposited in rivers or under the ground. The first task has been to compile a comprehensive database (in Excel, downloadable from the website) of all Celtic Art ever found in Britain.

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Concordia

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

The overall aim of the project was to make it easier for readers to move between publications on the Web, instead of walking from one library shelf to another. Bringing information together in this way helps researchers to recognise a new range of relationships and interactions.

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Aphrodisias in Late Antiquity (2004)

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This publication is the online second edition of a printed book, which first appeared in 1989, but was out of print: it incorporates new material found since 1989. The resource presents 250 inscribed texts from the 3rd-6th century, found at the ancient site of Aphrodisias in Caria (south-west Turkey): it includes extensive explanatory material and discussions, with detailed indices of people. The existence of the book makes it possible to compare the two ways of presenting the material.

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Pliny: A note manager

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Pliny project aims to promote some thinking that looks broadly at the provision of tools to support scholarship. One of its products is a piece of free software, also called Pliny, which facilitates note-taking and annotation, allowing its user to integrate these initial notes into a representation of an evolving personal interpretation.

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arts-humanities.net

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

arts-humanities.net is an online hub for research and teaching in the digital arts and humanities. It enables members to locate information, promote their research and discuss ideas. It aims to support and advance the use and understanding of digital tools and methods for research and teaching in the arts and humanities – and all fields and disciplines working with(in) them.

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Archaeotools: Data mining, facetted classification and E-archaeology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This two year project built upon previous ADS work to develop tools (the Common Information Environment - Archaeobrowser project) using advanced data mining and knowledge capture technologies to allow archaeologists to discover, share and analyse datasets and legacy publications that had hitherto been very difficult to integrate into digital frameworks. The project had three interrelated objectives, each represented by a distinct workpackage.

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