Archaeology

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Silchester Roman city: development of on-line archive for insula IX 'Town Life' project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's aim is the capture, storage and manipulation of data from a long-term archaeological excavation (1997 and continuing) of insula ix of the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester, Hampshire (Calleva Atrebatum). The data comprise a variety of linked excavation and finds records which are stored on the Integrated Archaeological Database (IADB). The latter is a key tool for the post-excavation analysis of this complex, stratified site for which publication is planned in both printed and web-based formats.

Academic field
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Virtual Kemet: an African-centred Egyptian gallery for prisons

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Since 2003 Dr Sally-Ann Ashton, an Egyptologist and Senior Assistant Keeper in the Department of Antiquities at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge has worked with prison education departments as part of an outreach programme. In order to expand her work and to explore the potential for using museum collections as an integral part of prison education, she was granted leave of absence from her post from September 2007 to September 2009. The project focused on Dr Ashton’s fieldwork and research, and the Egyptian and Nubian collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum.

Academic field
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Regnum Francorum Online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Regnum Francorum Online: interactive maps and sources of early medieval Europe, is a geospatial database with the aim of referencing historical events of Late Antiquity and Early Medieval (western) Europe to evidence in source-documents, compiling meta-data about the events, such as time, space and agency, and visualizing the events on interactive maps. This far, meta-data about more than 14.000 events are maintained in the database and avilable for further temporal and spatial analysis.

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Weaving communities of practice. Textiles, culture and identity in the Andes: a semiotic and ontological approach.

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Research in Bolivia, Peru and Chile,
combined with museum research there and in the UK, focuses on Bolivia,
Peru, and Chile on the basis of previous ethnographic, archaeological
and museological knowledge and contacts, and three time horizons:
Tiwanaku, the Inka-early colony, and the contemporary. The primary aims
of this project are: to link visual, computer and museum studies in
areas of cognition, and curatorial methods; to advance textile studies
in areas of structure mapping and correlations with socio-cultural data;

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Magnetic moments in the past: Developing archaeomagnetic dating for application in UK archaeology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project follows on from a previous collaboration which established a methodology for using measurements of the past magnetic field of the Earth for dating archaeological materials in the last 4000 years in the UK. The primary aim of this project is to realise the potential of this research by developing its practical application in UK archaeology. There is increasing interest in using archaeomagnetic dating as part of the suite of chronological tools available to archaeologists. However, it has yet to be adopted routinely.

Academic field
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The Prehistoric Stones of Greece: a resource from field-survey

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Prehistoric Stones of Greece (SOG) set out to enhance the research value of survey projects conducted in Greece that had recovered Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic materials. SOG’s focus was to establish a database of stone tools and prehistoric lithics generally and by drawing this material into a common format enhance the resource for a variety of archaeological purposes; in particular academic research and heritage management.

Academic field
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Tales of the Frontier: political representations and practices inspired by Hadrian's Wall

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Tales of the Frontier was a cross-disciplinary project that addressed the reception of Hadrian’s Wall from the sixth century to the internet. It involved archaeologists, classicists and geographers and is resulting in a number of published outputs (see website). Hadrian’s Wall is the one of the most evocative and powerful ancient monuments in Britain and the most famous frontier system (materially and culturally) of the Roman Empire.

Academic field
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Sudamih (Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities (Sudamih) Project aims to address a coherent range of requirements for the more effective management of data (broadly defined) within the Humanities at an institutional level. Whilst the project is fully embedded within the institutional context of Oxford University, the methodologies, outputs and outcomes will be of relevance to other research-led universities, especially but not only, in their support of research within the humanities. The projects aims to:

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Microliths and Mortuary Practices: late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers and landscapes in the Azraq Basin, Jordan.

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Our work presents critical insights into the timing and nature of the first sedentary villages, early animal domestication, the role of animals in social life, prehistoric health, mortuary practices, and the first cemeteries. It also raises questions as to whether the characteristics of `Uyun al-Hammam are unique, or indicative of broad trends in Epipalaeolithic behaviour. The research aims to test these questions through a combined programme of excavation, at the sites of Kharaneh IV and Ayn Qasiyah, and analysis of archaeological evidence for behavioural change in the Epipalaeolithic.

Academic field

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