Classics and Ancient History

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Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project is investigating human activity across the landscape during all time periods, using intensive archaeological and geomorphological survey. TAESP is working in a broad area of the north-central Troodos mountains that includes fertile valleys and plains, copper-bearing foothills, and the northern part of the Troodos Range itself. Other than some rescue excavation of tombs, no systematic archaeological work had been done in this area, and none at all in the mountains.

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Urban connectivity in Iron-Age and Roman Southern Spain

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Urban Connectivity in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain Project, funded by the AHRC between 2002 and 2005 with subsequent support by the University of Southampton and institutions in Seville, has been studying changing social, economic and geographical relationships between some 195 towns and nucleated settlements in central and western Baetica between c.500 BC and AD 200. The project has the following five research questions, based on data gathered in the field and through archival research between 2002 and 2008:

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Imaging papyri at Oxford

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Oxyrhynchus is a city in Upper Egypt, located about 160 km south-southwest of Cairo, in the governorate of Al Minya. It is also an archaeological site, considered one of the most important ever discovered. For the past century, the area around Oxyrhynchus has been continually excavated, yielding an enormous collection of papyrus texts dating from the time of the Ptolemaic and Roman periods of Egyptian history. Many of these texts are available online through the Imaging papyri at Oxford project.

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Representing and enacting knowledge about producing Tibetan text-critical editions

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aimed to advance our understanding of the processes of the textual criticism and editing of canonical and other Classical Tibetan texts - including the basic task of rendering them readable at all. These mainly ancient materials are undoubtedly of the very highest possible scholarly interest, but without intensive modern scholarship in most instances remain partially or completely incomprehensible because of accumulated errors in copying, as they have been for many centuries.

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Digital catalogue of illuminated manuscripts in the Western Collections of the British Library (DigCIM)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Project provides catalogue descriptions and images of illuminated manuscripts in the British Library's collection on a collection-by-collection basis. Thus far, entries for illuminated manuscripts in all of the Library's collections are available online and can be found via the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts website at:

www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts

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CASSS Digital Archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (CASSS) is a project to identify, record and publish in a consistent format, the earliest English sculpture dating from the 7th to the 11th centuries. Much of this material was unpublished before the work began, but it is of crucial importance as pointing to the earliest settlements and artistic achievements of the Anglo-Saxon/Pre-Norman English. It ranges from our earliest Christian field monuments (free-standing carved crosses), and innovative decorative elements and furnishings of churches, to humble grave-markers.

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Lexicon of Greek Personal Names

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Ancient Greek names provide crucial evidence to the historian. They reveal where people came from; they show what gods were popular at a given time; they may express political ideals. The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names project traces every bearer of every name, drawing on a huge variety of evidence, from personal tombstones, dedications, works of art, to civic decrees, treaties, citizen-lists etc., as well as literature, artefacts, graffiti etc. The result: almost 400,000 ancient Greeks on record.

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Masks for Menander: imaging and enactment

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Combining experimental archaeology and practice-based research, the project has investigated the performance qualities and style of the masks of Greek New Comedy. Its aims have been to image in 3D selected New Comedy monuments from UK and European museums, and to conduct studio research with full-size reconstructions of the masks, scaled exactly from the 3-dimensional co-ordinates.

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Roman amphorae: a digital resource

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this website is to provide an online introductory resource for the study of Roman amphorae. In the Roman empire amphorae were pottery containers used for the non-local transport of agricultural products. Their fragments litter archaeological sites of all kinds on land and at sea and have been a subject of serious study for over 100 years.

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The Italic Epigraphy Project: Text and Monument

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Based at the Institute of Classical Studies, London, and funded by a major grant over three years from the Arts and Humanities Research Board, the project aims to place in the hands of scholars the primary evidence both for the texts of the inscriptions of the peoples of Central Italy and for the monumental and archaeological context of these inscriptions.

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