Classics and Ancient History

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The Lexicon of Festus: text, translation and full scholarly commentary

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The Lexicon of Festus (de uerborum significatu) is a Latin dictionary compiled in the Roman imperial period which preserves a great deal of priceless information about the history, society, religion and topography of Rome and Italy in earlier centuries. It draws on a rich series of studies by the writers of Cicero's day, who collected and analysed information about the traditions of their past and the institutions of their own day, which they believed were in a state of serious decay.

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The body and mask in ancient theatre space

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project applies advanced 3 dimensional technologies to study the practice of ancient mask theatre. It produces 3D scans of Greek and Roman mask miniatures relating both to comedy and tragedy, and reproduces them at life-size by rapid prototyping. The project use 3D motion capture as well as ChromaKey technologies to record experimentation with these masks practitioners of Asiatic and European traditions, and situates the results in 3D modelled reserarch based ancient theatre spaces.
Aims and Objectives:

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The geography of knowledge in Assyria and Babylonia, 700-200 BCE: a diachronic comparison of four scholarly libraries

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Where is knowledge generated? How does that knowledge replicate and spread? Where is it consumed? Who owns knowledge, and who may access it? Under what circumstances, and in what places, does it flourish or die out? How are its transmission and reception influenced by social and political factors? These are central questions in the history and sociology of science today.

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An Imperial Frontier and its Landscape: the Gorgan and Tammisha Walls in North-East Iran

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

A primary aim of the project is to employ modern archaeological techniques to date this 195 km long baked brick wall and place it within its landscape context. Although ostensibly to protect the inhabited lands of NE Iran from the incursion of nomadic groups from the central Asian steppe, there is clearly more to this wall than meets the eye. Discoveries by our Iranian colleagues, now confirmed by fieldwork in 2005, demonstrate that the wall is associated with a massive system of water supply consisting of earthen dams and canals.

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Cambridge New Greek Lexicon Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal resource is a bilingual Dictionary, from Ancient Greek to English, designed for students of intermediate level and above. It is being composed to take account of the many new textual discoveries made since the last comparable dictionary in 1889, and to provide definitions and translations in modern English which will communicate clearly to contemporary readers. It is also being published as an online resource, so will be widely available to distance-learners.

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TEXTvre

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

TEXTvre will support the complete lifecycle of research in e-humanities textual studies by providing researchers with advanced services to process and analyse research texts that are held in formally managed, metadata-rich institutionally-based repositories. The access and analysis of textual research data will be supported by annotation and retrieval technology and will provide services for every step in the digital research life cycle.

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A scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, published on the internet

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project has created a full scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, one of the two oldest Greek Bibles and the oldest complete New Testament, arguably the most important of all surviving ancient manuscripts. It is part of a larger project to bring together all surviving leaves of the manuscript, divided among four different countries, into a virtual whole, and to provide access at every level from the general reader to the most advanced scholar.

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Inscriptions of Aphrodisias 2007

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is the first edition of the online corpus of the inscriptions of Aphrodisias recorded up to 1994. The editions, translations and commentary are by Joyce Reynolds, Charlotte Roueché and Gabriel Bodard.

Inscriptions are marked-up using the EpiDoc electronic editorial conventions developed by Tom Elliott and others. The website and the supporting materials were developed by the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London.

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Integrating Digital Papyrology (IDP)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Among humanistic fields, papyrology is notably well provided with digital resources for access to primary texts, metadata, and images of the papyri, ostraca, and tablets preserved in Greek, Latin, Arabic, various forms of ancient Egyptian, and several other languages. Over the past couple of years the two most important digital papyrological projects based in North America, the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS) and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) have developed plans for integrating and sustaining the two projects.

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