Classics and Ancient History

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DARIAH: Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Supporting and enhancing digitially enabled research.

The Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) aims to develop and maintain an infrastructure in support of ICT-based research practices across the arts and humanities, acting as a trusted intermediary between disciplines and domains. DARIAH is working with communities of practice to:

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Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth.

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Linking and Querying Ancient Texts (LaQuAT)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The LaQuAT (Linking and Querying Ancient Texts) project investigated technologies for providing integrated SQL-based views of diverse data resources related to classical archaeology, specifically containing epigraphic and papyrological material. These resources were quite heterogeneous in terms of standards and structure, comprising two relational databases with different schemas, and an XML-based corpus; they are hosted by different institutions in different countries, and are the outputs of divergent research communities.

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Concordia

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

The overall aim of the project was to make it easier for readers to move between publications on the Web, instead of walking from one library shelf to another. Bringing information together in this way helps researchers to recognise a new range of relationships and interactions.

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Aphrodisias in Late Antiquity (2004)

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This publication is the online second edition of a printed book, which first appeared in 1989, but was out of print: it incorporates new material found since 1989. The resource presents 250 inscribed texts from the 3rd-6th century, found at the ancient site of Aphrodisias in Caria (south-west Turkey): it includes extensive explanatory material and discussions, with detailed indices of people. The existence of the book makes it possible to compare the two ways of presenting the material.

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Pliny: A note manager

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Pliny project aims to promote some thinking that looks broadly at the provision of tools to support scholarship. One of its products is a piece of free software, also called Pliny, which facilitates note-taking and annotation, allowing its user to integrate these initial notes into a representation of an evolving personal interpretation.

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arts-humanities.net

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

arts-humanities.net is an online hub for research and teaching in the digital arts and humanities. It enables members to locate information, promote their research and discuss ideas. It aims to support and advance the use and understanding of digital tools and methods for research and teaching in the arts and humanities – and all fields and disciplines working with(in) them.

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Bibliotheca Academica Translationum: the transmission of classical scholarship in the Republic of Letters, 1700-1919

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Bibliotheca Academica Translationum is an international project; its aim is to study the transmission of knowledge between European scholarly communities and its diffusion in national cultures through the medium of translations of works of scholarship made during the period 1701-1917.

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Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC) makes freely available on the internet the best available materials for a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds. DARMC allows innovative spatial and temporal analyses of all aspects of the civilizations of western Eurasia in the first 1500 years of our era, as well as the generation of original maps illustrating differing aspects of ancient and medieval civilization.

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Mechanisms of communication in an ancient empire: The correspondence between the king of Assyria and his magnates in the 8th century BC

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The correspondence between Sargon II, king of Assyria (721-705 BC), and his governors and magnates is the largest text corpus of this kind known from antiquity and provides insight into the mechanisms of communication between the top levels of authority in an ancient empire. This website presents these letters together with resources and materials for their study and on their historical and cultural context. The research questions are: How did ancient empires cohere? What roles did long-distance communication play in that coherence?

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