Classics and Ancient History

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Linking and Querying Ancient Texts (LaQuAT)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The LaQuAT (Linking and Querying Ancient Texts) project investigated technologies for providing integrated SQL-based views of diverse data resources related to classical archaeology, specifically containing epigraphic and papyrological material. These resources were quite heterogeneous in terms of standards and structure, comprising two relational databases with different schemas, and an XML-based corpus; they are hosted by different institutions in different countries, and are the outputs of divergent research communities.

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TEXTvre

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

TEXTvre will support the complete lifecycle of research in e-humanities textual studies by providing researchers with advanced services to process and analyse research texts that are held in formally managed, metadata-rich institutionally-based repositories. The access and analysis of textual research data will be supported by annotation and retrieval technology and will provide services for every step in the digital research life cycle.

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A scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, published on the internet

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project has created a full scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, one of the two oldest Greek Bibles and the oldest complete New Testament, arguably the most important of all surviving ancient manuscripts. It is part of a larger project to bring together all surviving leaves of the manuscript, divided among four different countries, into a virtual whole, and to provide access at every level from the general reader to the most advanced scholar.

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Concordia

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

The overall aim of the project was to make it easier for readers to move between publications on the Web, instead of walking from one library shelf to another. Bringing information together in this way helps researchers to recognise a new range of relationships and interactions.

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Aphrodisias in Late Antiquity (2004)

Posted by Gabriel Bodard on March 29, 2015

This publication is the online second edition of a printed book, which first appeared in 1989, but was out of print: it incorporates new material found since 1989. The resource presents 250 inscribed texts from the 3rd-6th century, found at the ancient site of Aphrodisias in Caria (south-west Turkey): it includes extensive explanatory material and discussions, with detailed indices of people. The existence of the book makes it possible to compare the two ways of presenting the material.

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Pliny: A note manager

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Pliny project aims to promote some thinking that looks broadly at the provision of tools to support scholarship. One of its products is a piece of free software, also called Pliny, which facilitates note-taking and annotation, allowing its user to integrate these initial notes into a representation of an evolving personal interpretation.

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arts-humanities.net

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

arts-humanities.net is an online hub for research and teaching in the digital arts and humanities. It enables members to locate information, promote their research and discuss ideas. It aims to support and advance the use and understanding of digital tools and methods for research and teaching in the arts and humanities – and all fields and disciplines working with(in) them.

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Bibliotheca Academica Translationum: the transmission of classical scholarship in the Republic of Letters, 1700-1919

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Bibliotheca Academica Translationum is an international project; its aim is to study the transmission of knowledge between European scholarly communities and its diffusion in national cultures through the medium of translations of works of scholarship made during the period 1701-1917.

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The Last Statues of Antiquity

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Ancient towns were filled with life-size bronze and marble figures – by the third century important cities of the empire could have over a thousand such statues. The habit of erecting statues in public to rulers, and to other dignitaries and benefactors, was a defining characteristic of the ancient world. The dedication of statues expressed the relationship between rulers and ruled and articulated the benefaction-and-honour system of city politics. Statues also played a significant role in defining civic identity, and in forming and perpetuating a city’s collective memory.

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