Classics and Ancient History

section icon

The Last Statues of Antiquity

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Ancient towns were filled with life-size bronze and marble figures – by the third century important cities of the empire could have over a thousand such statues. The habit of erecting statues in public to rulers, and to other dignitaries and benefactors, was a defining characteristic of the ancient world. The dedication of statues expressed the relationship between rulers and ruled and articulated the benefaction-and-honour system of city politics. Statues also played a significant role in defining civic identity, and in forming and perpetuating a city’s collective memory.

section icon

Law and Empire, AD 193-455: the Projet Volterra (1)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The general aims of the Projet Volterra (named after Edoardo Volterra, the distinguished scholar of Roman Law) are to promote the study of Roman legislation in its full social, political and legal context, and its continuing tradition. The area of Roman imperial legal pronouncements was identified as one in which current scholarship was less than adequately served in terms of Regesten, repertoria and bibliographical aids. Within this field the area of later imperial legislation was felt to be particularly poorly exploited by scholars in general.

section icon

Sudamih (Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities (Sudamih) Project aims to address a coherent range of requirements for the more effective management of data (broadly defined) within the Humanities at an institutional level. Whilst the project is fully embedded within the institutional context of Oxford University, the methodologies, outputs and outcomes will be of relevance to other research-led universities, especially but not only, in their support of research within the humanities. The projects aims to:

section icon

Penguin Archive Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Penguin Archive Project is a four-year project with an aim to produce an on-line descriptive catalogue of the Penguin Archive, which will be launched on the web in due course and will continue to expand as the project develops. The project will also pioneer research in the archive, particularly in the areas of modern poetry, Penguin 'Specials' and their socio-political impact, and Penguin translations of the classics.

section icon

Royal Historical Society Bibliographies on British and Irish History

Posted by Simon Baker on February 26, 2015

The Royal Historical Society Bibliography of British and Irish history (now known as the Bibliography of British and Irish History and published by Brepols Publishers) is a database containing over 500,000 bibliographical records relating to British and Irish history, and to the British and Irish abroad, at all periods for which written evidence survives. The database aims to be as comprehensive as possible for publications since 1900, but includes some selected earlier material.

section icon

The Correspondence of William Henry Fox Talbot

Posted by Stephen Brown on February 26, 2015

The project has transcribed and published the more than 10,000 letters to and from William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), best known as the inventor of photography but also an MP, a landowner, an inventor, a scientist, a mathematician and a pioneering scholar of Assyrian cuneiform. The major group of letters was published in 2003. AHRB funding then ended and the University of Glasgow was unable to commit further resources to the project. In 2004, the project website was migrated to DeMontfort University, Leicester. A grant from the British Academy created a remote editing facility.

section icon

Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica (IRCyr)

Posted by Paul Spence on February 25, 2015

The project aims to assemble an online corpus of all the material gathered by Prof Joyce Reynolds during her numerous visits to Libya. The project consists in the digitisation of some 2000 inscriptions from Roman Cyrenaica, nearly a third of which have never previously been published. The new corpus will be presented as a series of documents; but it will also link to an online map of Roman Cyrenaica, being prepared as part of the Pleiades project (http://www.unc.edu/awmc/pleiades.html).

Pages