Divinity and Religious Studies

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Verbum: the old Latin translation of the gospel of John

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The outcome of the project is an edition of the Old Latin manuscripts of John which will replaced the existing Matzkow-Jülicher-Aland volume (1963), to be published electronically in the first instance, and later as an edition of John, with a full apparatus criticus containing the patristic citations in the definitive Institut-Vetus Latina series. The project, freestanding in itself, is also complementary to the International Greek New Testament Project. The material published will be of particular interest to the following;

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The corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this project is to publish catalogues of all the Anglo-Saxon carved stones, fully illustrated by high quality photographs, with general discussions concerning their relationships and significance, and full bibliographic references. Initially the regional volumes are published by the British Academy, but when the volumes are no longer in the Academy list they are published in shortened form on the internet. The digitized photographs are curated by the ADS (York).

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Digital catalogue of illuminated manuscripts in the Western Collections of the British Library (DigCIM)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Project provides catalogue descriptions and images of illuminated manuscripts in the British Library's collection on a collection-by-collection basis. Thus far, entries for illuminated manuscripts in all of the Library's collections are available online and can be found via the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts website at:

www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts

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English Monastic Archives: Access and Analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aims to provide a powerful tool for research on medieval English history by analysing documents generated by English monasteries with the help of databases. The questions the project addressed are: What properties (manors, churches and chapels) did each monastery own? How many monastic properties can be found in each county, and which houses, of which orders, owned them? What genres of documents did monasteries produce? How many documents in each genre have survived? Where are they to be found? How many documents of each type did each individual monastery produce?

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Representing and enacting knowledge about producing Tibetan text-critical editions

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aimed to advance our understanding of the processes of the textual criticism and editing of canonical and other Classical Tibetan texts - including the basic task of rendering them readable at all. These mainly ancient materials are undoubtedly of the very highest possible scholarly interest, but without intensive modern scholarship in most instances remain partially or completely incomprehensible because of accumulated errors in copying, as they have been for many centuries.

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The Historical Study and Documentation of the Pad Gling Traditions in Bhutan

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This research project aims to undertake a historical study of the Pad gling tradition and its establishments, focusing on the three principal institutions of Pad gling reincarnations: the Pad gling gSung spruls, who are considered reincarnations of Padma Gling pa himself and were based in lHa lung in Tibet and gTam zhing in Bhutan; the lHa lung Thugs sras, who are incarnations of Padma Glingpa’s son Zla ba rGyal mtshan (b.1499); and the sGang steng sPrul sku, who are considered reincarnations of Padma Gling pa’s grandson Padma 'Phrin las (1564-1642?).

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The decipherment, description and online accessibility of 16,500 medieval Hebrew and Judaeo-Arabic Genizah manuscripts

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project deciphers, describes, and digitises the medieval manuscripts from the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Collection at Cambridge University Library. The project describes and digitises around 16,500 items, creates bibliographic information, publishes catalogues, and provides access to descriptions, bibliographic information, and images online. The project gives scholars of religion, language, literature, culture, and history greater opportunity to study material from the collection.

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Buddhist Death Rituals of Southeast Asia and China

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Aims and objectives

We aim to establish a pattern of text and ritual for the Theravada countries of South and Southeast Asia concentrating on the death rites. In doing so we will accomplish the following objectives (listed according to project phases)

1.1 to compile a comprehensive bibliography of secondary literature on Theravada Buddhist death rituals in Southeast Asia
1.2 to define the parameters of research on Buddhist death rituals

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The Italian Academies 1530-1650: a themed collection database

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project promotes and facilitates research on the Italian learned Academies of the late Renaissance and early modern periods and their relationship to book production, printing and publishing in this period. The precise aim is to compile a comprehensive database of information relating to the membership and activities of Academies in Bologna, Naples, Padua and Siena and their links to the book trade as represented in the holdings of the British Library.

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DARIAH: Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Supporting and enhancing digitially enabled research.

The Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) aims to develop and maintain an infrastructure in support of ICT-based research practices across the arts and humanities, acting as a trusted intermediary between disciplines and domains. DARIAH is working with communities of practice to:

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