Divinity and Religious Studies

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JainPedia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

JainPedia will be a free world-leading resource on the web. It offers translations and transcriptions of selected texts and a wealth of contextual information about the Jain religion and its host society in India.
The JainPedia team is leading the digitisation of approximately 4,000 pages of the thousands of jain manuscripts and Jain objects in the United Kingdom. The involvement of eminent academics and volunteers from the Jain community in the project highlights how the expertise and enthusiasm of different groups can work together to produce a valuable resource for all.

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A scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, published on the internet

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project has created a full scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, one of the two oldest Greek Bibles and the oldest complete New Testament, arguably the most important of all surviving ancient manuscripts. It is part of a larger project to bring together all surviving leaves of the manuscript, divided among four different countries, into a virtual whole, and to provide access at every level from the general reader to the most advanced scholar.

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Early Nigerian Qur’anic manuscripts: an interdisciplinary study of the Kanuri glosses and Arabic commentaries

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Early Nigerian Qur’anic Manuscripts (ENiQMa) is an interdisciplinary project exploring a unique resource on Kanuri, an important West African language, and investigating the history of Islamic/Qur’anic studies in the Kanem-Borno Empire, which originated in the 9th century A.D. to the northeast of Lake Chad. Kanuri, together with its related variety Kanembu, is spoken by over four million people in Nigeria, Niger, Chad, and Cameroon. The main study areas covered by ENiQMa include linguistic analysis of Old Kanembu data and examination of the Islamic manuscripts in this same language.

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Pliny: A note manager

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Pliny project aims to promote some thinking that looks broadly at the provision of tools to support scholarship. One of its products is a piece of free software, also called Pliny, which facilitates note-taking and annotation, allowing its user to integrate these initial notes into a representation of an evolving personal interpretation.

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arts-humanities.net

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

arts-humanities.net is an online hub for research and teaching in the digital arts and humanities. It enables members to locate information, promote their research and discuss ideas. It aims to support and advance the use and understanding of digital tools and methods for research and teaching in the arts and humanities – and all fields and disciplines working with(in) them.

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Greek Bible in Byzantine Judaism (GBBJ )

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's mandate is to gather evidence for the use of Greek Bible translations by Jews in the Middle Ages, to edit and publish these remains, to subject them to linguistic analysis, and to compare them with other Greek biblical texts, earlier, contemporary and later. the corpus developed by the project comprises the exact remains of Jewish Greek Bible versions, edited from manuscripts. They include continuous texts, glossaries in Jewish sources, scholia, and marginalia in Christian manuscripts.

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Collected Works of Thomas Middleton

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Oxford Middleton, prepared by seventy-five scholars from a dozen countries, follows the precedent of The Oxford Shakespeare in being published in two volumes, an innovative but accessible Collected Works and a comprehensive scholarly Companion. Though closely connected, each volume can be used independently of the other.

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Novum Inventorium Sepulchrale - Kentish Anglo-Saxon graves and grave-goods in the Sonia Hawkes archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The county of Kent is exceptionally rich in Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and excavations of some of these cemeteries in the 18th and early 19th centuries provided a wealth of finds reflecting Kent's close political and economic ties to the Frankish world in the 5th to 7th centuries. The website contains a searchable database of manuscripts, photographs and drawings from Sonia Hawkes' collection. Some of the information from the excavations was published in the nineteenth century and in Sonia Hawkes' series of monographs.

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