Divinity and Religious Studies

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Fitna, the video battle: how YouTube enables the young to perform their religious and public identities

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

In March 2008, Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders released a 16 minute anti-Islam movie called Fitna. Wilders had a hard time finding a broadcaster or internet provider willing to air the film, because his mere idea caused an immense global controversy, leading to death threats, violent protest, diplomatic incidents and fierce public debate. One of the reactions consisted of organised and unorganised video protest by young people from all over the world, who uploaded their reactions to websites such as YouTube or LiveLeak.

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Monastic Archives: enhancement of typology and database

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The overriding aim of this project is to equip users of the existing web-based English Monastic Archives database with the expertise required to make the best use of the data that it structures. These records are of a volume and range that are unmatched in Britain save by the records of the Crown. In a previous project, an estimated 88% of the records were located and described, and the catalogue descriptions were made available on the internet. The present proposal seeks to build on that in three ways. 1.

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London's Past Online: a bibliography of Greater London's history

Posted by Simon Baker on February 26, 2015

London's Past Online was established to create a searchable online database of books, articles and other published material relating to the Greater London area from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. The work was undertaken by a research team based at the Centre for Metropolitan History. Core data was taken from Heather Creaton's 'Bibliography of Printed Works on London History to 1939' (LAPL, 1994) and its unpublished supplement, and the bibliography from her 'Sources for the History of London 1939-45' (BRA, 1998).

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Royal Historical Society Bibliographies on British and Irish History

Posted by Simon Baker on February 26, 2015

The Royal Historical Society Bibliography of British and Irish history (now known as the Bibliography of British and Irish History and published by Brepols Publishers) is a database containing over 500,000 bibliographical records relating to British and Irish history, and to the British and Irish abroad, at all periods for which written evidence survives. The database aims to be as comprehensive as possible for publications since 1900, but includes some selected earlier material.

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Digitisation and Access Enhancement of the Tibetan Dunhuang Manuscripts at the British Library

Posted by Ulrich Pagel on February 25, 2015

"Following extensive excavations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, tens of thousands of manuscripts, paintings, textiles and other artefacts dating from 100 BC - AD 1200 were found in the Library Cave at Dunhuang and at numerous other ancient Silk Road cities, temples and tombs in the Taklamakan and Gobi deserts. These constitute a fragile but very rich source of information about religion, art, history, politics, trade, science, culture and social life on the Eastern Silk Road around the first millennium AD.

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Interpreting The Bible and its Visual Expression Within the Cultural Landscape of Wales 1825-1975

Posted by Martin Crampin on February 25, 2015

The Imaging the Bible in Wales Research Project seeks to record a wide range of artwork from Wales during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that depicts biblical scenes and characters. The Bible has played a vital role in the religious and cultural life of Wales, and the project seeks to interpret the social, political and theological issues that the artworks raise.

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Monastic Wales

Posted by Martin Crampin on February 25, 2015

In an attempt to identify more firmly Wales's place on the monastic map of Europe, this new large-scale project seeks to establish a comprehensive monastic history of medieval Wales, the findings of which will be made available to scholars and students, as well as the wider public, both electronically and in print. This will include monasteries and houses of Canons which were active in Wales for some or all of the period from the late eleventh century until the Suppression of the religious houses in the sixteenth century.

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Typology of Anonymous and Pseudepigraphic Jewish Literature in Antiquity, c. 200 BCE to c. 700 CE

Posted by Alexander Samely on February 25, 2015

The first aim of our project was to work out the procedure, terminology and theoretical framework for a new description of literary features of ancient Jewish texts. This has resulted in a systematic generic Inventory of all structurally important features to be found in the anonymous or pseudepigraphic ancient Jewish literature, insofar as they are complete. We do however make some exceptions for the large Dead Sea Scrolls, which are therefore included in the descriptions and contribute to the Inventory.

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