English Language and Literature

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Grammatical change in recent English (1961-1991) : a corpus-based investigation

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's main goal was to investigate recent changes in English grammar during the period 1961-1991. Its secondary goal was to develop a new methodology for tracking changes in the language, using comparable or 'matching' corpora of text samples, and employing tagging software and grammar-sensitive search tools. A third goal was the provision of the part-of-speech tagged matching corpora for general distribution to the research community.

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The Hockliffe project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The Hockliffe Collection contains in excess of a thousand children's books which date from between 1685 and the early twentieth century. Most of the books in the collection were published between 1740 and 1840, a period which is generally considered to encompass the birth, infancy and growth to maturity of children's literature in English. Before the 1740s, only a handful of authors had directed their writing at children, few of whom, if any, saw it as their task to amuse or entertain their readers.

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Integrating prosody, pragmatics and syntax in a corpus-based linguistic description of Irish standard

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The project is titled Integrating prosody, pragmatics and syntax in a corpus-based linguistic description of Irish standard; £203,688 was allocated over the years 2003 to 2005, extended to 2006. This project builds on the 300 texts of the ICE-Ireland spoken component to provide an enriched corpus annotation that takes account of the prosody, pragmatics, and discourse features of spoken texts. Because of the internal organisation of ICE-Ireland, it is possible within the Prosody-Pragmatics-Discourse (or PPD) Corpus to compare speech in Northern Ireland with that in the Republic of Ireland.

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Digital catalogue of illuminated manuscripts in the Western Collections of the British Library (DigCIM)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Project provides catalogue descriptions and images of illuminated manuscripts in the British Library's collection on a collection-by-collection basis. Thus far, entries for illuminated manuscripts in all of the Library's collections are available online and can be found via the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts website at:

www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts

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The Canterbury Tales Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Canterbury Tales Project aims to investigate the textual tradition of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to achieve a better understanding of the history of its composition and publication before 1500. Here is how we work:

We have established a system of transcription for all the manuscripts and early printed books of the Canterbury Tales into computer-readable form.

We transcribe the manuscripts using this system.

We compare all the manuscripts, creating a record of their agreements and disagreements with a computer collation program (Collate).

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The Edinburgh Historical Linguistic Atlases & Text Corpora: Early Middle English and Older Scots (2)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal aims of the project are to produce two historical linguistic atlases: A Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English, 1150-1300 (LAME) and A Linguistic Atlas of Older Scots phase I 1380-1500 (LAOS). These atlases follow «A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English» (LALME), ed. Angus McIntosh, M.L. Samuels and Michael Benskin (Aberdeen: AUP, 1986). In the periods covered by these atlases, neither English nor Scots were written in a standard form. Written forms are characterized by variation – different spellings of ‘the same’ word or morpheme.

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The Reading Experience Database 1450-1945 (RED)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this project is to investigate how and why reading as an individual and social practice has changed over the period 1450 to 1945, in terms of who readers were; how they accessed reading material; what, where, and how they read; and how they responded to what they read. Supported by funding from AHRC and from The Open University, the central achievement of the project to date has been the establishment of The Reading Experience Database (RED) at The Open University.

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The Historical Thesaurus of English (HTE)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Historical Thesaurus of English is the first historical thesaurus to be compiled for any of the world's languages. It includes almost the entire recorded vocabulary of English from Old English to the modern period, taken from the Oxford English Dictionary and dictionaries of Old English. The distinctive, semantically-structured hierarchy of the HTE data allows scholars access to material in a uniquely flexible manner, making it an invaluable resource to historians and linguists in particular.

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