English Language and Literature

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The British Book Trade Index on the Web

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The British Book Trade Index is a computerised index of the names, brief biographical and trade details of all those who worked in the English and Welsh book trades and were at work before 1852. It includes not only printers, publishers and booksellers but also stationers, papermakers, engravers, auctioneers, ink-makers, pen and quill sellers, etc., so that the trade may be studied in the context of allied trades.

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An electronic catalogue of vernacular manuscript books of the Medieval WestMidlands

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The manuscripts of the West Midlands have long been valuable resources for medieval English literary and book history. Research has focused on individual manuscripts or small groups. Surviving in large numbers and from well-documented regional centres of book production, they potentially offer a resource for investigation of the regional parameters of manuscript culture. Systematic manuscript geography has hitherto been inhibited by lack of research tools for large-scale comparative work.

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The Language of Landscape: Reading the Anglo-Saxon Countryside

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The aim of the LangScape project is to make accessible over the World Wide Web a rich body of material relating to the English Countryside of a thousand years ago and more: detailed descriptions by those who lived in and worked the Anglo-Saxon landscape. The proposed resource - an electronic corpus of Anglo-Saxon boundary clauses with extensive XML mark-up - will be a powerful research tool with applications within a broad range of academic disciplines.

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Early Stuart Libels: an electronic edition of political poems from manuscript sources

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

“Early Stuart Libels” is a web-based edition of early seventeenth-century political poetry from manuscript sources. It brings into the public domain over 350 poems, many of which have never before been published. Though most of the texts are poems of satire and invective, others take the form of anti-libels, responding to libellers with orthodox panegyric. These poems throw new light on literary and political culture Early Stuart Libels: an edition of poetry from manuscript sources. Ed. Alastair Bellany and Andrew McRae with the assistance of Paul E.J. Hammer and Michelle O'Callaghan.

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Town and Townscape: The Work and Life of Thomas Sharp

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Thomas Sharp (1901-1978) was a key figure in town planning in the mid-twentieth century. The concepts he developed in his writings and plans have been of enduring significance and influence on thinking about planning and design for both practitioners and academics in the UK and beyond. He was a key figure in defining thinking about the forms that town and countryside should take; in reconciling existing and valued character with modernity, and; in making these arguments accessible through a series of polemical books.

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A Key to English Place-Names

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"A Key to English Place-Names is a database maintained at the Institute for Name-Studies, School of English, The University of Nottingham. It is intended to provide an up-to-date guide to the interpretation of the names of England's cities, towns and villages, drawing on the work of the English Place-Name Society (itself housed within the institute) and other researchers.Readers are encouraged (by a 'Your Comments' box beside each name) to offer comments on the appropriateness of otherwise of the etymologies (e.g.

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The Clarendon edition of Charles Dickens' Our Mutual Friend

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Clarendon edition of Our Mutual Friend is the authoritative critical text of Dickens’s last completed novel. It acknowledges and documents the writer’s intentions, from manuscript through proofs and the various editions over which he exercised editorial control.The primary feature is that the critically edited text, an ‘ideal first edition’, will adopt a historical approach to the novel, in order to produce a text which embodies Dickens’s (extended) creative impulse.

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