English Language and Literature

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The Complete Works of James Shirley (1596-1666) (Editorial Project)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Complete Works of James Shirley will be a corpus of around 50 works, including plays, poems, and prose. James Shirley was an innovative dramatist specializing in tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, masque, pastoral, entertainment, morality, and neo-miracle, Shirley wrote for a wide variety of theatres, ranging from the Blackfriars to the first public playhouse in Dublin, but he also composed poems and grammars. Although Shirley was arguably the most significant dramatic writer of the late English Renaissance, and his complete works have never been edited.

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Identification of the Scribes Responsible for Copying Major Works of Middle English Literature

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project has investigated the manuscripts of all literary works by five major Middle English writers (the manuscripts dating 1375-1600), Geoffrey Chaucer, Thomas Hoccleve, William Langland, John Gower and John Trevisa, to find relationships among the writers and their patrons and audiences through the identification of the scribes who wrote the manuscripts. We will have examined over 300 manuscripts in libraries worldwide, and analyzed the number of hands in each manuscript and the other manuscripts written by these hands.

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An old-spelling edition of the complete works of John Ford, together with an electronic concordance

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project will produce an old-spelling edition of the seventeenth century author John Ford's complete poems, prose works and plays, including co-authored works, in monograph and online form. Texts will be freshly edited from the original Quarto editions, all extant copies of the Quartos will be collated, and editors will provide a text, textual collations and bibliographical notes, an introduction and full commentary.

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The Letters of Bess of Hardwick

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Elizabeth, countess of Shrewsbury (c.1522-1608), known as ‘Bess of Hardwick’, is one of Elizabethan England most famous figures. She is renowned for her reputation as an indomitable matriarch and dynast and perhaps best known as the builder of great stately homes like the magnificent Hardwick Hall and Chatsworth House. The story of her life as told to date takes little account of her more than 230 letters. The aim of the project is to make these letters accessible by producing a searchable, interactive online edition of all ca. 230 letters written to and from Bess of Hardwick.

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From Goslar to Grasmere: Moving Through and Dwelling in Wordsworth's Manuscript Spaces

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project explores the potential of manuscript materials for two Wordsworth texts (early Prelude material and Home at Grasmere) which are both about the importance of place to the writing of poetry. The project has put the manuscript materials online and wants to open up an understanding of the relationship between actual physical place (today) and imagined, textual space in the content of the poem and the making of the manuscript.

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Bibliography of Scottish literature in translation; pre 1900 project (1)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Bibliography of Scottish Literature in Translation (BOSLIT) is an online resource that offers an extensive and readily accessible source of information about Scottish literature in translation. With currently over 25,000 records, and steadily increasing, BOSLIT aims to serve the needs of academic researchers, writers and translators, libraries, schools, literature administrators and general readers.

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The Relevance of the Major Scottish Collections of Printed Renaissance Drama to the Cultural History and Contemporary Reception of Shakespeare

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The research is intended to develop and deepen our understanding of the significance of particular items in the libraries' holdings and the histories of the various individual collections that make up those holdings. This work will provide the basis for a major exhibition to be held at the National Library.

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Who Were the Nuns?

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project is a prosopographical study of the English convents in exile during the period 1600-1800 when it was illegal to be a nun in Britain. Key research questions include a broad response to the question 'Who were the nuns?' This involves locating the members in their family, religious, political and economic context and identifying the support networks sustaining the convents over two centuries.

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Women in Modern Irish Culture

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The database includes a whole range of publications, such as novels, articles, poems, memoirs, travel writing, essays, cookery writing, plays, films, etc. The database also provides biographical details, where available, such as birth dates, date of death, place of birth and death, places associated with a particular author, together with all known pseudonyms. Every known edition of a book, play, or film is listed, along with details of printers and publishers for each work.

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Staging the Henrician Court

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace is the only great hall built by Henry VIII. It is also the only existing Renaissance building in England for which there is unambiguous evidence of its being used for performances throughout the period c.1525 - 1658. In particular, the Great Hall at Hampton Court is largely the same space today as it was when William Shakespeare staged his A Midsummer Night's Dream before James I and VI. Staging the Henrician Court is an interdisciplinary research project into John Heywood's drama, the Play of the Wether.

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