English Language and Literature

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Making Britain: South Asian Visions of Home and Abroad (1870-1950)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Making Britain Database launched in September 2010. It houses an annotated bibliography of selected materials relating to South Asian artists, writers, activists and organizations in Britain during the period 1870 to 1950. Britain has had a migrant South Asian population for over 350 years, since its early trading encounters with India. But the perception that a homogeneous British culture only began to diversify after the Second World War persists, and research into the South Asian diaspora in Britain has focused predominantly on this later, post-independence period.

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Sudamih (Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities (Sudamih) Project aims to address a coherent range of requirements for the more effective management of data (broadly defined) within the Humanities at an institutional level. Whilst the project is fully embedded within the institutional context of Oxford University, the methodologies, outputs and outcomes will be of relevance to other research-led universities, especially but not only, in their support of research within the humanities. The projects aims to:

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Moving Manchester / Mediating Marginalities: How the experience of migration has informed the work of writers in Greater Manchester

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Moving Manchester (formerly 'Mediating Marginalities') has spent the past four years (2006-2010) investigating the ways in which the experience of migration has impacted upon contemporary writing in the city and, by extension, the ways in which these multicultural publications and performances have impacted upon the urban population's view of itself as well as the wider perception of Manchester as a British city.

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A searchable, standards based catalogue of the Calum Maclean collection of Gaelic oral narrative

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Calum Maclean Collection Online Catalogue Project aims to make a major collection of material central to Scottish Ethnology available in digital form as an accessible and flexible research resource. The collection consists of over 13,000 manuscript pages of transcriptions of Gaelic folklore and song from the fieldwork of Calum Iain Maclean (1915-1960) carried out mainly in the Scottish Hebrides as well as in the Scottish Mainland Highlands. Primarily the collection consists of tale-texts together with full-length autobiographies from two major storytellers.

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Poetry Beyond Text: Vision, Text and Cognition

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This research project uses psychological, critical and creative methods to study how readers respond to the visual aspects of poetry. It involves specialists in English and Comparative Literature, Fine Art and Psychology. These include the shape of visual or concrete poetry (where words are arranged spatially in particular patterns on the page), the combination of poetry with images (in artists' books and prints), and the moving words and images found in digital poetry (a relatively new form of poetry which is usually web-based and often interactive).

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The origins of early modern literature: recovering mid-Tudor writing for a modern readership

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aims to redress the critical neglect of mid-Tudor writing, a period which saw the Reformation, the consolidation of the Tudor state, and the rise of English as a national language. The project team have compiled a searchable, on-line catalogue of literary works printed in English, 1519-1579 - the decades which precede, and lay the foundations for, the canonical period of English Renaissance Literature.

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William Godwin's Diary

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project provides a digital edition of the diary of William Godwin (1756-1836). Godwin’s diary consists of 32 octavo notebooks. The first entry is for 6 April 1788 and the final entry is for 26 March 1836, shortly before he died. The diary is a resource of immense importance to researchers of history, politics, literature, and women’s studies.

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Strandlines

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Strandlines Digital Community is a King’s College London initiative that explores one of London’s most famous streets, the Strand, and its past and present communities. The project brings together local residents, workers and visitors by means of storytelling. Using digital technologies and techniques from life writing – a creative field concerned with personal life stories – it seeks to foster a more active sense of community in the Strand area.

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Wyndham Lewis's Art Criticism in the "Listener", 1946-1951: Postwar British Art in its Context of Ideas, Institutions, and Practice.

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project is focused on the entire work of Wyndham Lewis, and pays particular attention to the ideological aspects of his thinking. At the same time it is concerned with those aspects of his work which either have not been explored by Spanish or foreign critics, or have been dealt with in equivocal or politically mediated ways. Since a great deal of Lewis's literary production remains dispersed in hard-to-find periodical publications, above all in the USA and Canada, we shall bring these materials together for study and publication.

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Penguin Archive Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Penguin Archive Project is a four-year project with an aim to produce an on-line descriptive catalogue of the Penguin Archive, which will be launched on the web in due course and will continue to expand as the project develops. The project will also pioneer research in the archive, particularly in the areas of modern poetry, Penguin 'Specials' and their socio-political impact, and Penguin translations of the classics.

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