History

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Pockets of history: production and consumption of women's tie-on pockets in Britain from 1690-1914

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project charts the production and consumption of women’s tie-on pockets in Britain over two centuries. These textile artefacts, familiar to Lucy Locket, were popular before the introduction of handbags in the later nineteenth century but are now largely unknown. Their capacious form, plain or decorated, and their varied contents exemplified everyday work, tastes, and skills of women across the social spectrum. They were made at home throughout the period by individuals for their own use and also manufactured commercially from the mid-18th century.

Academic field
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Statue of Buddha, National Museums Liverpool, UK

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"This project by Conservation Technologies, National Museums Liverpool, was concerned with recording and digital reconstruction of a 13th-century Japanese statue of Buddha in the World Museum Liverpool. The subject of this investigation was a 70cm-high wooden sculpture probably made in Japan during the Kamakura period (1185 – 1333). Painted floral decoration visible today was applied during the later Edo period (1600 – 1868). There are also other changes in the original appearance and some features are missing.

Academic field
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The corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this project is to publish catalogues of all the Anglo-Saxon carved stones, fully illustrated by high quality photographs, with general discussions concerning their relationships and significance, and full bibliographic references. Initially the regional volumes are published by the British Academy, but when the volumes are no longer in the Academy list they are published in shortened form on the internet. The digitized photographs are curated by the ADS (York).

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Digital catalogue of illuminated manuscripts in the Western Collections of the British Library (DigCIM)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Project provides catalogue descriptions and images of illuminated manuscripts in the British Library's collection on a collection-by-collection basis. Thus far, entries for illuminated manuscripts in all of the Library's collections are available online and can be found via the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts website at:

www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts

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The digital and computer-based arts in the United Kingdom from their origins to 1980

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

CACHe is a major research project into the origins and history of British computer arts.

We are based at the School of History of Art, Film and Visual Media at Birkbeck, University of London and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board. The substantial government funding for our project indicates the level of interest in creating an historical framework for this period. CACHe began its work in 2002.

Academic field
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South Seas Project: Voyaging and Cross-Cultural Encounters in the Pacific (1760-1800)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

South Seas is an online information resource for the history of European voyaging and cross-cultural encounters in the Pacific between 1760 and 1800. The first phase is focused on James Cook’s momentous first voyage of discovery of 1768-1771. South Seas offers the full text of the holograph manuscript of James Cook’s Endeavour Journal held by the National Library of Australia, together with the full texts of the journals kept by Joseph Banks and Sydney Parkinson on the voyage.

Academic field
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English Monastic Archives: Access and Analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aims to provide a powerful tool for research on medieval English history by analysing documents generated by English monasteries with the help of databases. The questions the project addressed are: What properties (manors, churches and chapels) did each monastery own? How many monastic properties can be found in each county, and which houses, of which orders, owned them? What genres of documents did monasteries produce? How many documents in each genre have survived? Where are they to be found? How many documents of each type did each individual monastery produce?

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The British Book Trade Index on the Web

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The British Book Trade Index is a computerised index of the names, brief biographical and trade details of all those who worked in the English and Welsh book trades and were at work before 1852. It includes not only printers, publishers and booksellers but also stationers, papermakers, engravers, auctioneers, ink-makers, pen and quill sellers, etc., so that the trade may be studied in the context of allied trades.

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