History

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Richard II and the English Royal Treasure

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The treasure roll of Richard II, compiled in 1398/9, offers a rare insight into the magnificence of a late medieval English king. The roll, unknown until it was rediscovered in the 1990s, describes in exceptional detail the crowns, jewels, and other precious objects belonging to the king and to his two queens, Anne of Bohemia and Isabelle of France. The value of the items listed on the roll is extraordinary even by modern standards, as is the craftsmanship and skill that went into their production.

Academic field
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The History of the Chinese Maritime Customs Service (1854 - 1949)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"Building on earlier collaborations with historians at Cambridge University and the Second Historical Archives of China, this 2003-07 AHRC-funded project is designed to further understandings of the modern Chinese state, British imperial history, and the history of modern globalization in China, by focusing on the role the Chinese Maritime Customs Service and its staff played in these historical processes.

Academic field
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The Language of Landscape: Reading the Anglo-Saxon Countryside

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The aim of the LangScape project is to make accessible over the World Wide Web a rich body of material relating to the English Countryside of a thousand years ago and more: detailed descriptions by those who lived in and worked the Anglo-Saxon landscape. The proposed resource - an electronic corpus of Anglo-Saxon boundary clauses with extensive XML mark-up - will be a powerful research tool with applications within a broad range of academic disciplines.

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Virtual Reconstruction of Palladio’s Teatro Olimpico

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Teatro Olimpico at Vicenza, Italy - still existent and well preserved - was built in 1580-85 for the local Accademia Olimpica (founded in 1556) on a plot provided by the city council. It was the first permanent theatre to be built in Europe since antiquity. The stage, which resembles a façade of a Renaissance palace, and the semi-oval sitting area were designed by the architect and founding member of the Accademia, Andrea Palladio (1508-80). He died soon after the work began; his son, Silla took over.

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3D Reconstruction of the Unbuilt Project Pont destiné à réunir la France à l’Italie (1829) by Henri Labrouste

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Henri Labrouste (1801-75) is best known as the architect of two important public buildings in Paris, both libraries. The Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, completed in 1851, demonstrated Labrouste's unconventional use of classical elements, much disputed at the time, and his structural innovation of introducing an exposed iron frame. The Bibliothèque Nationale, completed in the year of his death, is renowned for its eclectic reading room reminiscent of a Seljuk mosque: a light, top-lit round space with slender cast-iron columns, which support a multitude of small domes.

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Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"PASE is a relational database giving access to structured information on all of the recorded inhabitants of Anglo-Saxon England from the late sixth to the end of the eleventh century. It is intended to serve as a research tool suitable for a wide range of users with an interest in this period: whether academics in various disciplines, or local historians, or students in schools and universities, or those exploring the past for reasons of their own.

Academic field

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