Librarianship

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The Reading Experience Database 1450-1945 (RED)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of this project is to investigate how and why reading as an individual and social practice has changed over the period 1450 to 1945, in terms of who readers were; how they accessed reading material; what, where, and how they read; and how they responded to what they read. Supported by funding from AHRC and from The Open University, the central achievement of the project to date has been the establishment of The Reading Experience Database (RED) at The Open University.

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Multidimensional Visualisation of Archival Finding Aids

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

As more archival finding aids, of increasing complexity, become available online the difficulty of seeing the 'wood from the trees' increases. This is particularly the case when these are implemented in EAD (Encoded Archival Description). In part, this is caused by the inherent difficulty of navigating hierarchical structures (the need go back up and across before you can go down again) but also a symptom of the lack of innovation in visualising archival information.

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The British Book Trade Index on the Web

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The British Book Trade Index is a computerised index of the names, brief biographical and trade details of all those who worked in the English and Welsh book trades and were at work before 1852. It includes not only printers, publishers and booksellers but also stationers, papermakers, engravers, auctioneers, ink-makers, pen and quill sellers, etc., so that the trade may be studied in the context of allied trades.

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English Monastic Archives: Access and Analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aims to provide a powerful tool for research on medieval English history by analysing documents generated by English monasteries with the help of databases. The questions the project addressed are: What properties (manors, churches and chapels) did each monastery own? How many monastic properties can be found in each county, and which houses, of which orders, owned them? What genres of documents did monasteries produce? How many documents in each genre have survived? Where are they to be found? How many documents of each type did each individual monastery produce?

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Fully descriptive analytic catalogue of the Waddell Manuscripts NGB (including miniatur paintings & other artwork)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The Rig 'dzin Tshe dbang nor bu edition of the rNying ma'i rgyud 'bum is a beautifully illustrated set of manuscripts, originally in thirty-three volumes, thirty volumes of which survive. It represents an important collection of Tibetan Buddhist tantric scriptures, once with many witnesses, but now with only a handful of extant editions. Of all the surviving editions, the Rig 'dzin Tshe dbang nor bu edition is the most lavishly produced, manufactured from good materials, finely decorated, and illustrated with many high quality hand-painted miniatures.

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Semantic Tools for Archaeological Resources

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Increasingly within archaeology, the Web is used for dissemination of datasets. This contributes to the growing amount of information on the ‘deep web’, which a recent Bright Planet study estimated to be 500 times larger than the ‘surface web’. However Google and other web search engines are ill equipped to retrieve information from the richly structured databases that are key resources for humanities scholars. Important archaeological results and reports are also appearing as grey literature, before or instead of traditional publication.

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Siobhan Davies Dance Online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Siobhan Davies Dance Online is a project that created a fully searchable, online, digital archive of the work of the choreographer Siobhan Davies. In addition to extensive film footage of performances and rehearsals, photographs, programmes etc. it includes scholarly articles, performance reviews, interviews with audience members, analytical commentaries from Siobhan Davies, some of the dancers with the company and others plus a number of other artefacts.

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Database of Archives of UK Non-Governmental Organisations (DANGO)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This AHRC-funded project provides information on the availability of records relating to non-governmental organisations and pressure groups active in the UK since 1945. The database is fully searchable and provides information on the history of the organisation as well as details about the location of archival records relating to it.

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Beyond the Book: Mass Reading Events and Contemporary Cultures of Reading

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Mass reading events – ‘Richard & Judy's Book Club,’ ‘One Book, One Chicago’ – are a new, proliferating literary phenomenon that remains uninvestigated. They raise important questions: why do they cause people to come together to share reading? Do they attract marginalized communities, foster new reading practices, enable social change? Our interdisciplinary project produces a trans-national analysis of contemporary shared reading practices, the formation of reading communities and the popular function of literary fiction in the UK, USA and Canada.

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Empowering the user: the development of flexible archival catalogues

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project is exploring the issues involved in creating a dynamic and flexible online archival finding aid, which is responsive to the needs of individual researchers. The project’s premise is that most archival finding aids are rigid, mono-hierarchical lists, which cannot adequately reflect the multiple contexts and complex inter-relationships of records. The project is taking a more flexible approach. By separating descriptions of the content of a record from descriptions of its context, the project is free to link any individual record to any number of different contexts.

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