Librarianship

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Pliny: A note manager

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Pliny project aims to promote some thinking that looks broadly at the provision of tools to support scholarship. One of its products is a piece of free software, also called Pliny, which facilitates note-taking and annotation, allowing its user to integrate these initial notes into a representation of an evolving personal interpretation.

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arts-humanities.net

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

arts-humanities.net is an online hub for research and teaching in the digital arts and humanities. It enables members to locate information, promote their research and discuss ideas. It aims to support and advance the use and understanding of digital tools and methods for research and teaching in the arts and humanities – and all fields and disciplines working with(in) them.

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Primary Sources on Copyright (1450-1900) (Electronic Database of Historical Materials on Copyright from Five Key Jurisdictions)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Information norms (and in particular the laws of intellectual property) are constitutive of modern societies. An understanding of the sources of these norms is critical to understanding the scope and direction of current laws. The resource relates to key historical documents in the field of copyright, from the invention of the printing press (ca1450) to the blue print of an international author rights regime devised with the Berne Convention of 1886.

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Intangible Cultural Heritage in Scotland

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project is concerned with the conserving and recording of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) in Scotland. ICH means the practices, representations, expressions, knowledges and skills and associated objects and spaces associated with them - that communities, groups and in some cases individuals recognise as part of their cultural heritage. In recent years, ICH has received international recognition and its safeguarding has become one of the priorities of international cooperation.

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Person Data Repository of the 19th Century

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project “Construction of a repository for biographical data on historical persons of the 19th century” – short form: Person Data Repository – enhances the existing approaches to data integration and electronically supported research in biographies. It investigates connecting and presenting heterogeneous information on persons of the “long nineteenth century” (1789–1914). The project's aim is to provide a de-central software system for research institutions, universities, archives, and libraries that allows combined access on biographic information from different data pools.

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Rationalisation and Enhancement of Historic British Archaeology Collections at the Ashmolean Museum

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim was to improve access to data in the British archaeological collections, in terms of archives, database and the objects themselves; enhancement of quality of information on objects, sites, excavators, and collectors. The material includes over three centuries of collecting of archaeological material from the British Isles (palaeolithic to post-medieval), together with associated excavation and collection archives.

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Novum Inventorium Sepulchrale - Kentish Anglo-Saxon graves and grave-goods in the Sonia Hawkes archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The county of Kent is exceptionally rich in Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and excavations of some of these cemeteries in the 18th and early 19th centuries provided a wealth of finds reflecting Kent's close political and economic ties to the Frankish world in the 5th to 7th centuries. The website contains a searchable database of manuscripts, photographs and drawings from Sonia Hawkes' collection. Some of the information from the excavations was published in the nineteenth century and in Sonia Hawkes' series of monographs.

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Democratising Technology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

How can we imagine the future? "Democratising Technology" engages people who are marginalised by design decisions about digital technologies in choosing how our world might be. In an age of computer networks and growing (but intangible) connectivity between people and things, we offer a series of techniques, suitable for a wide range of groups, which encourage participation, imaginative re-thinking and making connections to help us articulate how we'd like to interact in the future.

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