Librarianship

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The National Inventory Research Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The National Inventory Research Project is involved in researching and documenting pre-1900 European paintings in UK public collections. It aims to: Add new research to museum holdings of pre-1900 European paintings; Make up-to-date information about these collections more readily available. The 'NICE Paintings' database gives access to newly researched information about 8,300 pictures in public collections throughout the UK.

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Reanimating John Latham through Archive as Event

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project is about organising the documents of the late artist John Latham: a vast amount of unpublished and disorganised correspondence, writings, video, audio tapes and other material found at his house in South London. The research will produce detailed descriptions of the archive contents and a newly designed database and classification system that will mirror Latham's theories on 'Events and Event Structures'.

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Edinburgh City of Print

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Edinburgh: City of Print is a joint AHRC and Museum Galleries Scotland funded partnership project between the Scottish Archive of Print and Publishing History Records (SAPPHIRE) and City of Edinburgh Museums. The project aims to highlight Edinburgh’s rich printing and publishing heritage through the online provision of photographs, film and sound recordings relating to the collections of City of Edinburgh Museums.

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FELSSO: Finite Elements with Laser Scanning for mechanical analysis of Sculptural Objects

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The FELSSO project has used commercially available advanced 3D laser scanning technology to capture detailed 3D surface geometry data of the sculptures with these data then being converted into computer models of the original object that are then subjected to finite element analysis (FEA). Originally, it was planned to use sculptures in the Tate collection as the basis for the study. However, the Henry Moore Foundation has given permission for Moore’s travertine stone Arch to be used as the principal subject for the FELSSO study.

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Reanimating cultural heritage: digital repatriation, knowledge networks and civil society strengthening in post-conflict Sierra Leone

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This multidisciplinary project is concerned with innovating 'digital curatorship' in relation to Sierra Leonean collections dispersed in the global museumscape. Extending research in anthropology, museum studies, informatics and beyond, the project considers how objects that have become isolated from the oral and performative contexts that originally animated them can be reanimated in digital space alongside associated images, video clips, sounds, texts and other media, and thereby given new life.

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Glasgow Emblem Digitisation Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The site has been developed, with generous funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council under the Resource Enhancement Scheme, by a team led by Post-Doctoral Research Assistant Jonathan Spangler, and Project Director Alison Adams. All but two of the emblem books digitised are from the Stirling Maxwell Collection in Glasgow University Library. The Bodleian Library and the Bibliothèque Mazarine have generously made material available to enable us to present the complete corpus. The Project is undertaken within the OpenEmblem initiative.

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Bridging the semantic gap in visual information retrieval

Posted by Peter Enser on March 29, 2015

This project was conducted between 2004 and 2007 by a team drawn from the universities of Brighton and Southampton. It sought to bring new understandings and competencies to the problem of retrieving still images from within large, managed collections of such artefacts. The existence of a ‘semantic gap’ is a well-known limitation on the functionality of present-day visual image retrieval systems.

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