Linguistics

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French interlanguage oral corpora

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Unlike first language acquisition (L1) research, which has made use of digital technologies for over 20 years to assist its research (in the shape of a powerful suite of software tools for the transcription, analysis and storage of L1 oral learner data, the CHILDES system, now used as standard), the field of second language acquisition (L2) research has been very slow in taking advantage of the new computerised technologies now available.

Academic field
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Grammatical change in recent English (1961-1991) : a corpus-based investigation

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's main goal was to investigate recent changes in English grammar during the period 1961-1991. Its secondary goal was to develop a new methodology for tracking changes in the language, using comparable or 'matching' corpora of text samples, and employing tagging software and grammar-sensitive search tools. A third goal was the provision of the part-of-speech tagged matching corpora for general distribution to the research community.

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The Notion 'Possible Word' and its Limits: a typology of suppletion

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

While linguists have investigated the notions ‘possible human language’ and ‘possible sentence’, less has been done to establish the bounds of possibility for the word. As part of continuing research into inflectional morphology, we intend to explore one of these boundaries, where different inflectional forms are not related phonologically. An example is Russian čelovek ‘person’, which has the plural ljud-i, a typical instance of suppletion. Suppletion is found in many inflecting languages and involves extremely frequent words. As Carstairs-McCarthy shows, the phenomenon “increasingly ...

Academic field
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The Sheffield Corpus of Chinese

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The initial feasibility study 'Chinese Texts in Electronic Form for Linguistic Analysis' was based on a limited number of Chinese text samples from the Song (960-1279), Ming (1366-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties: a formal prose in the Southern-Song period; a martial arts fiction in the Ming Dynasty; and a general fiction in the Qing Dynasty.

Academic field
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Wa dictionary and internet database for minority languages of Burma

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The SOAS Wa Dictionary Project is a three-year effort (2003-2006), funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board to produce a high-quality dictionary, translating Wa into Chinese, Burmese/Myanmar and English. The project uses advanced techniques in corpus-based lexicography, centred on a database and Internet resource, which will also be suitable for other languages spoken in Burma/Myanmar besides Wa after the life of the project.
Aims and Objectives

The academic objectives of this project are

Academic field
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Reconstructing the Quseiri Arabic Documents (RQAD)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The research objective is to read or reconstruct the Arabic documents found at the harbour town of Quseir on the Egyptian Red Sea coast during the Ayyubid and Mamluk periods (13th-15th centuries)
ie:
a) to evaluate the texts combined with archeological enquiry;
b) to examine the content and context within the framework of the long distance trade and pilgrim traffic from Quesir as a chief port of the Red Sea region and its trade contacts with the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean.

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The Edinburgh Historical Linguistic Atlases & Text Corpora: Early Middle English and Older Scots (2)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal aims of the project are to produce two historical linguistic atlases: A Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English, 1150-1300 (LAME) and A Linguistic Atlas of Older Scots phase I 1380-1500 (LAOS). These atlases follow «A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English» (LALME), ed. Angus McIntosh, M.L. Samuels and Michael Benskin (Aberdeen: AUP, 1986). In the periods covered by these atlases, neither English nor Scots were written in a standard form. Written forms are characterized by variation – different spellings of ‘the same’ word or morpheme.

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The Historical Thesaurus of English (HTE)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Historical Thesaurus of English is the first historical thesaurus to be compiled for any of the world's languages. It includes almost the entire recorded vocabulary of English from Old English to the modern period, taken from the Oxford English Dictionary and dictionaries of Old English. The distinctive, semantically-structured hierarchy of the HTE data allows scholars access to material in a uniquely flexible manner, making it an invaluable resource to historians and linguists in particular.

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