Linguistics

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Language convergence and linguistic areas

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The replication of concrete formal-structural material (morpho-phonological forms with attached meanings) from one language in another is universally understood as grammatical and lexical "borrowing". More controversial is the interpretation of contact-induced structural change that does not involve such replication of forms, but is manifested rather through shift in meaning, distribution, or organisation of inherited material, inspired by an external model. Such changes are sometimes referred to as "convergent developments", and are often typical of linguistic areas.

Academic field
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A typology of defectiveness

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

An important design feature of language is the ‘productive pattern’. We have enjoy ~ enjoyed, agree ~ agreed, and many others. Even if the pattern is not fully regular, there will be a form available, as in understand ~ understood. Surprisingly, this principle is sometimes violated, a phenomenon known as ‘defectiveness’, which means there a gap in a word’s set of forms.

Academic field
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The decipherment, description and online accessibility of 16,500 medieval Hebrew and Judaeo-Arabic Genizah manuscripts

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project deciphers, describes, and digitises the medieval manuscripts from the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Collection at Cambridge University Library. The project describes and digitises around 16,500 items, creates bibliographic information, publishes catalogues, and provides access to descriptions, bibliographic information, and images online. The project gives scholars of religion, language, literature, culture, and history greater opportunity to study material from the collection.

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Cambridge New Greek Lexicon Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal resource is a bilingual Dictionary, from Ancient Greek to English, designed for students of intermediate level and above. It is being composed to take account of the many new textual discoveries made since the last comparable dictionary in 1889, and to provide definitions and translations in modern English which will communicate clearly to contemporary readers. It is also being published as an online resource, so will be widely available to distance-learners.

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The Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing (1700-1945)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing (1700-1945) project will provide an evidence-based platform for a new account of the development of Modern Scots and Scottish English. It will create a major research resource, namely a publicly available, digitised archive of texts in language varieties ranging from Broad Scots to Scottish Standard English. This corpus will provide the 'missing link' between the Helsinki Corpus of Older Scots and its related projects (1375-1700) and the Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech (1945-present day; www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk ).

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Revised on-line edition of A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim of the present project is to make A LINGUISTIC ATLAS OF LATE MEDIAEVAL ENGLISH, an indispensable reference tool to scholars working on the language and literature of the Middle English period, more accessible and flexible as an interactive website (e-LALME). E-LALME will be available to every user from their own desktop and will be linked to a Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English (LAEME) and a Linguistic Atlas of Older Scots (LAOS).

Academic field
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Codeswitching and convergence in Welsh: a universal versus a typological approach

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"A corpus of spoken Welsh and Welsh-English code-switching is available to researchers as part of the Talkbank database. It consists of about 2.5 hours of recordings of informal conversations involving groups or pairs of speakers in North-West Wales and about 2.5 hours of excerpts from BBC Radio Cymru programmes. The data can be used for research on Welsh-English code-switching as well as general research on spoken Welsh.

Academic field
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Autonomous Morphology in Diachrony: comparative evidence from the Romance languages

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Romance verb reveals some seemingly nonsensical, but diachronically and geographically recurrent, patterns in its paradigmatic structure, which show remarkable diachronic robustness, self-reinforcement and self-replication. The recurrent but autonomously morphological structures presupposed by such changes furnish crucial diachronic corroboration for the notion of ‘morphomes’ as elaborated by M. Aronoff (Morphology By Itself 1994), and in general for the importance of ‘inferential-realizational’ strategies in acquisition and language change (see G. Stump Inflectional Morphology 2000).

Academic field
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Integrating Digital Papyrology (IDP)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Among humanistic fields, papyrology is notably well provided with digital resources for access to primary texts, metadata, and images of the papyri, ostraca, and tablets preserved in Greek, Latin, Arabic, various forms of ancient Egyptian, and several other languages. Over the past couple of years the two most important digital papyrological projects based in North America, the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS) and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) have developed plans for integrating and sustaining the two projects.

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