Linguistics

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Bibliotheca Academica Translationum: the transmission of classical scholarship in the Republic of Letters, 1700-1919

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Bibliotheca Academica Translationum is an international project; its aim is to study the transmission of knowledge between European scholarly communities and its diffusion in national cultures through the medium of translations of works of scholarship made during the period 1701-1917.

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The North Eastern Neo-Aramaic Dialects

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The North Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialects (generally known as the NENA dialects) form a very diverse group of Aramaic dialects that were spoken until modern times in Northern Iraq, North West Iran and South Eastern Turkey by Christian and Jewish communities. These are among the last remaining living vestiges of the Aramaic language, which was one of the major languages of the region in antiquity. The construction of the database is taking place at the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies of Cambridge University within the framework of a five year project.

Academic field
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Revision of the Anglo-Norman Dictionary, F-H

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Anglo-Norman Dictionary (AND) is the only serious attempt to present in its entirety the vocabulary of this form of French from which so much of modern English derives, and as such, it is a fundamental scholarly resource for the history of English, as well as of French, and of medieval society. The first edition of the AND dates back to 1947, considerably enlarged with new lexicographical data during the 1980's, the entries for A-E were the first to be marked up in xml between 2002 and 2004.

Academic field
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Revision of the Anglo-Norman Dictionary (I-M)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Anglo-Norman Dictionary (AND) is the only serious attempt to present in its entirety the vocabulary of this form of French from which so much of modern English derives, and as such, it is a fundamental scholarly resource for the history of English, as well as of French, and of medieval society. The first edition of the AND dates back to 1947, considerably enlarged with new lexicographical data during the 1980's, the entries for A-E were the first to be marked up in xml between 2002 and 2004.

Academic field
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The Anglo-Norman On-line Hub (Phase 1)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Anglo-Norman Dictionary (AND) is the only serious attempt to present in its entirety the vocabulary of this form of French from which so much of modern English derives, and as such, it is a fundamental scholarly resource for the history of English, as well as of French, and of medieval society. The first edition of the AND dates back to 1947, considerably enlarged with new lexicographical data during the 1980's, the entries for A-E were the first to be marked up in xml between 2002 and 2004.

Academic field
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The Edinburgh Historical Linguistic Atlases & Text Corpora: Early Middle English and Older Scots (1)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The principal aims of the project are to produce two historical linguistic atlases: A Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English, 1150-1300 (LAME) and A Linguistic Atlas of Older Scots phase I 1380-1500 (LAOS). These atlases follow 'A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English' (LALME, McIntosh, Samuels and Benskin 1986). In the periods covered by these atlases, neither English nor Scots were written in a standard form. Written forms are characterized by variation – different spellings of ‘the same’ word or morpheme. Variants often show geographical patterning.

Academic field
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Digital Himalaya Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Digital Himalaya project was designed by Professor Alan Macfarlane and Dr Mark Turin as a strategy for archiving and making available valuable ethnographic materials from the Himalayan region. The Digital Himalaya project had three primary objectives:

1. to preserve in a digital medium archival anthropological materials from the Himalayan region that were quickly degenerating in their current forms, including films in various formats, still photographs, sound recordings, field notes, maps and rare journals

Academic field
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Short term morphosyntactic change: Variation in Russian 1801-2000

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Russian is a language with a rich and relatively stable system of inflectional morphology. Yet while the system of forms has changed relatively little, the use of these forms has undergone a remarkable degree of change over a short time period. Changes include distribution of cases, of gender and number values, and of the competing inflectional forms of adjectives. These changes are dramatic when taken individually; however they do not form an obvious single picture, and there is no tendency to eliminate these morphosyntactic choices.

Academic field
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Germanic possessive -s : an empirical, historical and theoretical study

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Two much-debated questions in recent theoretical linguistics concern the historical origin of grammatical markers and their synchronic status. Researchers have adduced key evidence for both from the evolution of English possessive -s and the related but subtly different constructions in Swedish and Dutch. What has not to date been attempted, and what the present proposal offers, is a systematic synchronic and diachronic comparison of these constructions across all three languages.

Academic field
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Documentation of endangered languages and cultures in the Nigeria-Cameroon borderland

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Nigeria-Cameroon borderland is one of the most linguistically diverse regions of the world, with many languages either near extinction or severely endangered. This project builds on previous work by the participants in surveying and documenting endangered languages in this region. One example is the language of the Somyewe, a small group of blacksmiths whose language and culture are on the verge of disappearing. Documentation of two other local languages will also be undertaken.

Academic field

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