Linguistics

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The Cairo Genizah manuscripts: Taylor-Schechter Old Series and the Mosseri Collection

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aims to complete the cataloguing and detailed description of the Old Series of the Taylor-Schechter Cairo Genizah Collection and a substantial proportion of the Jacques Mosseri Genizah Collection. The T-S Collection consists of approx. 193,000 medieval (and early modern) Jewish manuscripts recovered from a storeroom (Genizah) in Old Cairo one hundred years ago, and is an unparalleled resource for the study of medieval Judaism, Islam and the history of the Mediterranean and Near East in the Middle Ages. The Old Series is the historical core of the Collection, and approx.

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Angloromani: A structural and functional description

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

English Romanes - also called 'Angloromani' by researchers - is the language or speech form of the English and Welsh Romani Gypsies. Earlier generations of British Gypsies spoke a dialect of Romani that was closely related to the Romani dialects of continental Europe. Knowledge and use of Romani declined among Gypsies in Britain during the nineteenth century, and today what remains of the language is mainly a vocabulary of words of Romani origin. English Gypsies often use these Romani words within their English conversation.

Academic field
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Sudamih (Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities (Sudamih) Project aims to address a coherent range of requirements for the more effective management of data (broadly defined) within the Humanities at an institutional level. Whilst the project is fully embedded within the institutional context of Oxford University, the methodologies, outputs and outcomes will be of relevance to other research-led universities, especially but not only, in their support of research within the humanities. The projects aims to:

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Unlocking the Celtic Collector; The Mind, Methods and Materials of Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912).

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Carmichael Watson collection in Edinburgh University Library, centred on the papers of the pioneering folklorist Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912), is the foremost collection of its kind in the country, and is crucial to understanding the customs, storytelling traditions, poetry, songs and general lore of the Gaelic-speaking areas of Scotland. The project will see an intense dissemination and research programme alongside development of a digital resource that will enable users to search fully-indexed catalogue descriptions, full text transcriptions and biographical records.

Academic field
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An electronic corpus of 15th century Castilian cancionero manuscripts; towards completion of the Dutton project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

When Brian Dutton died prematurely in his 60th year (1994), he had completed his magnum opus, the seven-volume El cancionero castellano del siglo XV, in book format (Salamanca: Universidad, 1990-91), but although he had used electronic preparation of texts, he was unable to fulfil the dream of conversion to electronic usage. We can now present the online website version of the Dutton project of courtly verse, alongside our own project of the longer moralistic, didactic and religious Castilian verse of the fifteenth century.

Academic field
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Turning owners into actors: Possessive morphology as subject-indexing in languages of the Bougainville region

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

A fundamental communicative task for all languages is to show which participant in a sentence is the subject. Languages have various ways of identifying the subject, including word-order, agreement, and case-marking. However, there is another unique and strange method, almost entirely unknown until now, found only in Northwest-Solomonic (NWS), a group of Oceanic languages of the Solomon Islands and Bougainville. In some constructions, these languages indicate subject using word-forms normally indicating possessors of nouns.

Academic field
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Children's playground games and songs in the new media age

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project will update, analyse and re-present three important collections of children's playground songs and rhymes: the Opie Collection of Children's Games and Songs, and selections from collections at the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition (NATCECT) and the Leeds Archive of Vernacular Culture (LAVC).

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World Oral Literature Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The World Oral Literature Project is an urgent global initiative to document and make accessible endangered oral literatures before they disappear without record.

Established at the University of Cambridge in 2009, the project aspires to become a permanent centre for the appreciation and preservation of oral literature and collaborate with local communities to document their own oral narratives. The World Oral Literature Project will also publish a library of oral texts and occasional papers, and make the collections accessible through new media platforms.

Academic field
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A historical corpus of the Welsh language

Posted by David Willis on February 26, 2015

The Historical Corpus of the Welsh Language 1500-1850 is a collection of Welsh texts from the period 1500-1850 in an electronic format. It is the result of a project to encode Welsh texts of the period funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB Resource Enhancement Award RE11900) in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Cambridge between 2001 and 2004. The project's Principle Investigator was David Willis, while Ingo Mittendorf was the project's Research Associate.

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The Anglo-Norman On-line Hub

Posted by Michael Beddow on February 26, 2015

Phase 1 of the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub project (2002-2004), funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board under its Resource Enhancement Scheme, had the following aims and objectives:

to open up for on-line access significant resources that will advance research into the languages and society of medieval Britain and support university courses across a wide areas of medieval studies;

to develop, evaluate, deploy and propagate XML-based technologies that will be of service in many areas of Humanities computing worlwide.

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