Modern Languages

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Citation and Allusion in the Ars nova French Chanson and Motet: Memory, Tradition, and Innovation

Posted by Gary Stringer on March 29, 2015

This project undertakes the first detailed study of citation and allusion in the period c1340-1420 as expressed in the two genres at the cutting edge of musical style at the time, the motet and the chanson. Medieval composers had always demonstrated a readiness to exploit existing material in their creation of new works, nowhere more conspicuously than in the 13th-century motet.

Academic field
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The decipherment, description and online accessibility of 16,500 medieval Hebrew and Judaeo-Arabic Genizah manuscripts

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project deciphers, describes, and digitises the medieval manuscripts from the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Collection at Cambridge University Library. The project describes and digitises around 16,500 items, creates bibliographic information, publishes catalogues, and provides access to descriptions, bibliographic information, and images online. The project gives scholars of religion, language, literature, culture, and history greater opportunity to study material from the collection.

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The Italian Academies 1530-1650: a themed collection database

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project promotes and facilitates research on the Italian learned Academies of the late Renaissance and early modern periods and their relationship to book production, printing and publishing in this period. The precise aim is to compile a comprehensive database of information relating to the membership and activities of Academies in Bologna, Naples, Padua and Siena and their links to the book trade as represented in the holdings of the British Library.

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TEXTvre

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

TEXTvre will support the complete lifecycle of research in e-humanities textual studies by providing researchers with advanced services to process and analyse research texts that are held in formally managed, metadata-rich institutionally-based repositories. The access and analysis of textual research data will be supported by annotation and retrieval technology and will provide services for every step in the digital research life cycle.

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DARIAH: Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Supporting and enhancing digitially enabled research.

The Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) aims to develop and maintain an infrastructure in support of ICT-based research practices across the arts and humanities, acting as a trusted intermediary between disciplines and domains. DARIAH is working with communities of practice to:

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Integrating Digital Papyrology (IDP)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Among humanistic fields, papyrology is notably well provided with digital resources for access to primary texts, metadata, and images of the papyri, ostraca, and tablets preserved in Greek, Latin, Arabic, various forms of ancient Egyptian, and several other languages. Over the past couple of years the two most important digital papyrological projects based in North America, the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS) and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) have developed plans for integrating and sustaining the two projects.

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Leeds Poetry 1950-1980

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Leeds University Library holds extensive archives (including original manuscripts, correspondence and tape-recordings) relating to poets working at or connected with the University between 1950 and 1980. As a whole, these resources bear witness to a vibrant regional literary culture centred on the University in the post-war period, and have much to offer scholars, historians, and readers of modern English poetry.

Academic field
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Digitisation of the South Asian oral history archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Centre of South Asian Studies won a Resource Enhancement Grant from the AHRC to begin the digitisation of its oral history collections. There are around 300 recordings in this collection, mostly held on audio cassette, with some reel-to-reel tape recordings as well. The project was completed in 2009 - the interviews, transcripts and various search functions are now available on the Centre of South Asian Studies' website.

Academic field
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Autonomous Morphology in Diachrony: comparative evidence from the Romance languages

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Romance verb reveals some seemingly nonsensical, but diachronically and geographically recurrent, patterns in its paradigmatic structure, which show remarkable diachronic robustness, self-reinforcement and self-replication. The recurrent but autonomously morphological structures presupposed by such changes furnish crucial diachronic corroboration for the notion of ‘morphomes’ as elaborated by M. Aronoff (Morphology By Itself 1994), and in general for the importance of ‘inferential-realizational’ strategies in acquisition and language change (see G. Stump Inflectional Morphology 2000).

Academic field

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