Modern Languages

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The Saint-Aubins' 'Book of Arses': The Livre de Caricatures tant bonnes que mauvaises

Posted by Colin Jones on March 29, 2015

The project is focussed on a highly unusual book of eighteenth-century caricatures, the 'Livre de caricatures tant bonnes que mauvaises', composed between the 1740s and the 1770s by the Saint-Aubin brothers and associates.
The Project aims to digitise the volume (which contains 387 pages) and to place it on the web in the form of a critical edition.

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Wyndham Lewis's Art Criticism in the "Listener", 1946-1951: Postwar British Art in its Context of Ideas, Institutions, and Practice.

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project is focused on the entire work of Wyndham Lewis, and pays particular attention to the ideological aspects of his thinking. At the same time it is concerned with those aspects of his work which either have not been explored by Spanish or foreign critics, or have been dealt with in equivocal or politically mediated ways. Since a great deal of Lewis's literary production remains dispersed in hard-to-find periodical publications, above all in the USA and Canada, we shall bring these materials together for study and publication.

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Turning owners into actors: Possessive morphology as subject-indexing in languages of the Bougainville region

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

A fundamental communicative task for all languages is to show which participant in a sentence is the subject. Languages have various ways of identifying the subject, including word-order, agreement, and case-marking. However, there is another unique and strange method, almost entirely unknown until now, found only in Northwest-Solomonic (NWS), a group of Oceanic languages of the Solomon Islands and Bougainville. In some constructions, these languages indicate subject using word-forms normally indicating possessors of nouns.

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Poetry Beyond Text: Vision, Text and Cognition

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This research project uses psychological, critical and creative methods to study how readers respond to the visual aspects of poetry. It involves specialists in English and Comparative Literature, Fine Art and Psychology. These include the shape of visual or concrete poetry (where words are arranged spatially in particular patterns on the page), the combination of poetry with images (in artists' books and prints), and the moving words and images found in digital poetry (a relatively new form of poetry which is usually web-based and often interactive).

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CESAR IMAGES: a searchable online repository of French theatre images 1600-1800

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The primary aim was to produce a single, coherent listing of all known theatre and related performances in France between 1600 and 1800, searchable by date, title, location, genre and by the names of the people involved in whatever capacity. The database was to have an interactive web interface. The second aim was to make the entire structure bi-directional, i.e. to take advantage of the same web interface to permit members of the international scholarly community, after a simple registration procedure, to annotate, comment upon, extend and correct any field in the database.

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The Correspondence of William Henry Fox Talbot

Posted by Stephen Brown on February 26, 2015

The project has transcribed and published the more than 10,000 letters to and from William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), best known as the inventor of photography but also an MP, a landowner, an inventor, a scientist, a mathematician and a pioneering scholar of Assyrian cuneiform. The major group of letters was published in 2003. AHRB funding then ended and the University of Glasgow was unable to commit further resources to the project. In 2004, the project website was migrated to DeMontfort University, Leicester. A grant from the British Academy created a remote editing facility.

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A historical corpus of the Welsh language

Posted by David Willis on February 26, 2015

The Historical Corpus of the Welsh Language 1500-1850 is a collection of Welsh texts from the period 1500-1850 in an electronic format. It is the result of a project to encode Welsh texts of the period funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB Resource Enhancement Award RE11900) in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Cambridge between 2001 and 2004. The project's Principle Investigator was David Willis, while Ingo Mittendorf was the project's Research Associate.

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PARADISEC

Posted by Nick Thieberger on February 26, 2015

PARADISEC (the Pacific And Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) offers a facility for digital conservation and access for endangered materials from the Pacific region, defined broadly to include Oceania and East and Southeast Asia. Our research group has developed models to ensure that the archive can provide access to interested communities, and conforms with emerging international standards for digital archiving. We have established a framework for accessioning, cataloguing and digitising audio, text and visual material, and preserving digital copies.

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Sound and Metre in Italian Medieval and Renaissance Narrative Verse

Posted by David Robey on February 26, 2015

An on-line database containing an exact, detailed and systematic representation of the sound and metre of the major narrative poems of the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance. The database provides a firm evidence base for the analysis, comparison and interpretation of specific structures, and combinations of structures, across a substantial corpus of related poetic texts. It also aims to develop and test the capacity of computer-based processes to serve the purposes of literary scholarship.

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The Anglo-Norman On-line Hub

Posted by Michael Beddow on February 26, 2015

Phase 1 of the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub project (2002-2004), funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board under its Resource Enhancement Scheme, had the following aims and objectives:

to open up for on-line access significant resources that will advance research into the languages and society of medieval Britain and support university courses across a wide areas of medieval studies;

to develop, evaluate, deploy and propagate XML-based technologies that will be of service in many areas of Humanities computing worlwide.

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