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ArtHistoryTeachingResources.org

Posted by Michelle Millar... on August 15, 2014

Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR) is a peer-populated platform for art history teachers. AHTR is home to a constantly evolving and collectively authored online repository of art history teaching content including, but not limited to, lesson plans, video introductions to museums, book reviews, image clusters, and classroom and museum activities. The site promotes discussion and reflection around new ways of teaching and learning in the art history classroom through a peer-populated blog, and fosters a collaborative virtual community for art history instructors at all career stages.

Academic field
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Neatline

Posted by Ronda Grizzle on August 13, 2014

Neatline is a geotemporal exhibit-builder that allows you to create beautiful, complex maps, image annotations, and narrative sequences from Omeka collections of archives and artifacts, and to connect your maps and narratives with timelines that are more-than-usually sensitive to ambiguity and nuance. Neatline lets you make hand-crafted, interactive stories as interpretive expressions of a single document or a whole archival or cultural heritage collection.

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CATMA

Posted by Evelyn Gius on August 12, 2014

CATMA (short for Computer Aided Text Markup and Annotation) is a practical and intuitive tool for literary scholars, students and other parties with an interest in text analysis and literary or other text oriented research. By helping perform many of the procedures useful for text analysis that normally have to be carried out entirely manually, CATMA permits to save a great amount of time and work. Being implemented as a web application in the newest version, CATMA also facilitates the exchange of analytical results via the internet, which makes collaborative work more comfortable.

Academic field
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The Writing Studies Tree

Posted by Amanda Licastro on January 30, 2013

The Writing Studies Tree (writingstudiestree.org) – an online, open-access, interactive database of individual scholars, educational institutions, and the disciplinary movements that connect them – offers an “academic genealogy” for the field of writing studies that serves as a model for visualizing the social history of humanities disciplines. Through a fixed data structure that gives open editing privileges to thousands of members, the site aggregates collective visualizations of the field, presenting its history anew and enabling scholars to identify patterns and movements in new ways.

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Martha Berry Digital Archive and Crowd-Ed

Posted by Martha Berry Di... on January 28, 2013

The Martha Berry Digital Archive (MBDA) project is publishing the writings of early 20th-century educator and philanthropist Martha Berry. To achieve project goals, MBDA has developed and is currently testing a participatory metadata editing tool which enables Dublin Core metadata editing in the Omeka platform.

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HuNI: Humanities Networked Infrastructure

Posted by Toby Burrows on December 11, 2012

The HuNI Project is integrating 28 of Australia’s most important cultural datasets into a ‘virtual laboratory’. These datasets comprise more than 2 million authoritative records relating to the people, objects and events that make up the country’s rich heritage.

The HuNI Virtual Laboratory will facilitate specialist research and help to break down barriers between disciplines and uncover new insights into Australia’s cultural landscape.

Academic field
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Free Press Bible

Posted by David Janca on November 30, 2012

Free Press Bible is a tool that promotes deep ideological self examination and refinement through a process called self canonization and targeted discussion based on user chosen articles. More can be learned by visiting the website or communicating with me directly.

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Modernist Versions Project

Posted by Modernist Versi... on June 21, 2012

The Modernist Versions Project (MVP) aims to advance the potential for comparative interpretations of modernist texts that exist in multiple forms by digitizing, collating, versioning, and visualizing them individually and in combination. Its primary mission is to enable new critical insights that are difficult without digital or computational approaches.

Academic field

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