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Chinese Text Project

Posted by Donald Sturgeon on January 26, 2015

The Chinese Text Project is an online open-access digital library that makes pre-modern Chinese texts available to readers and researchers all around the world. The site attempts to make use of the digital medium to explore new ways of interacting with these texts that are not possible in print. With over ten thousand titles and more than one billion characters, the Chinese Text Project is also one of the largest databases of pre-modern Chinese texts in existence.

Academic field
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Lexicon of Scholarly Editing

Posted by Wout Dillen on September 22, 2014

As its name implies, the Lexicon of Scholarly Editing is an open access academic resource that offers definitions for contested concepts in the field of Scholarly Editing and Textual Criticism. Rather than writing new definitions for these concepts, the Lexicon quotes definitions from academic journals and monographs. As such, the Lexicon aims to reveal the lively multilingual debates these concepts have spurred in the field.

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Dear Professor Einstein: The Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists in Post-War America

Posted by Anne Bahde on August 15, 2014

This project uses Omeka to present an illustrated exhibit about the history of the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists and the Americans who responded to its call, using representative items from the collection and other nuclear history collections held in SCARC.

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ArtHistoryTeachingResources.org

Posted by Michelle Millar... on August 15, 2014

Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR) is a peer-populated platform for art history teachers. AHTR is home to a constantly evolving and collectively authored online repository of art history teaching content including, but not limited to, lesson plans, video introductions to museums, book reviews, image clusters, and classroom and museum activities. The site promotes discussion and reflection around new ways of teaching and learning in the art history classroom through a peer-populated blog, and fosters a collaborative virtual community for art history instructors at all career stages.

Academic field
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Human Adult Neurogendering: Brain Plasticity and Sex Difference Research

Posted by Tabea Cornel on July 9, 2014

ABSTRACT: This paper analyses the extent to which the growing research on neuroplasticity in the 20th century related to neuroscientific investigations into sex differences. In the late 19th century, William James formulated the notion of a malleable brain that is responsive to exterior influences. At the same time, however, the influential work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal led to an adoption of the view of a static adult brain.

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ReMetCa: a tool to create a digital repertory on Medieval Spanish poetry

Posted by Elena González-... on February 28, 2013

The aim of this Project is to create a digital metrical repertory on Medieval Castilian poetry (ReMetCa). It will gather poetic testimonies from the very beginnings of Spanish lyrics at the end of 12th century, until the rich and varied poetic manifestations from the Cancioneros of the 15th and 16th centuries, ending with the Cancionero General de Hernando del Castillo (1511).

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The Writing Studies Tree

Posted by Amanda Licastro on January 30, 2013

The Writing Studies Tree (writingstudiestree.org) – an online, open-access, interactive database of individual scholars, educational institutions, and the disciplinary movements that connect them – offers an “academic genealogy” for the field of writing studies that serves as a model for visualizing the social history of humanities disciplines. Through a fixed data structure that gives open editing privileges to thousands of members, the site aggregates collective visualizations of the field, presenting its history anew and enabling scholars to identify patterns and movements in new ways.

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Adapting Modernism (tentative)

Posted by Joseph Fruscione on January 7, 2013

I'd like to start a digital project--part collaborative forum, part archive, part teaching tool--regarding adaptations and remediations of literary works. I'm not seeing this as a blog or compendium per se, but more as a diverse, interactive resource for teachers and students involved in courses featuring literary texts and adaptations of them (e.g, film, graphic novel, mashup, visual, etc.). Ideally, such a DH resource would aid us as scholars and as teachers, as well as aiding students in different kinds of courses.

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