Other

People

section icon

Early Monasticism and Classical Paideia

Posted by Benjamin Ekman on March 6, 2012

In collaboration with prof. Chiara Faraggiana of the Dipartimento di Storie e Metodi per la Conservazione dei Beni Culturali of the University of Bologna and the Patristische Kommission der Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen, the research program is developing a database for the traditions of the Apophthehmata Patrum and related texts from the early monastic tradition.

Academic field
section icon

Digitizing 'Chinese Englishmen'

Posted by Adeline Koh on February 28, 2012

This is a digital project focusing on the creation of “Asian Victorians” in Southeast Asia under British colonialism. It focuses on the digitization and annotation of the Straits Chinese Magazine, a journal produced by the Chinese diaspora in Southeast Asia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

section icon

DH Curation Guide

Posted by DH Curation Guide on February 23, 2012

The DH Curation Guide is a compilation of articles and annotated resources that address aspects of data curation in the digital humanities. The goal of the DH Curation Guide is to direct readers to trusted resources with enough context from expert editors and the other members of the research community to indicate to how these resources might help them with their own data curation challenges.

Help type
section icon

The Colonial Despatches of BC and Vancouver Island

Posted by Martin Holmes on January 26, 2012

This digital archive contains the original correspondence between the British Colonial Office and the colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia. This project aims to digitize and publish online a complete archive of the correspondence covering the period from 1846 leading to the founding of Vancouver Island in 1849, the founding of British Columbia in 1858, the annexation of Vancouver Island by British Columbia in 1866, and up to the incorporation of B.C. into the Canadian Federation in 1871.

section icon

Digital Humanities Initiative, Hamilton College

Posted by Janet Thomas Simons on January 20, 2012

The Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) at Hamilton College is a collaboratory – digital parlance for a research and teaching collaboration – where new media and computing technologies are used to promote humanities-based teaching, research, and scholarship across the liberal arts. See our projects list at http://www.dhinitiative.org/projects/

DHi challenges the ways in which teachers and students interact, use, and create digital collections (archival holdings) through the design and implementation of new digital tools.

Academic field
section icon

History Engine

Posted by Robert K. Nelson on January 9, 2012

The History Engine (http://historyengine.richmond.edu) is a pedagogically oriented project that captures and organizes “episodes”—concise narratives about often local events (e.g. the burning of abolitionist literature in Charleston in 1836 or the reaction of Chinese immigrants in New Orleans in 1911 to an imperial decree instructing them to cut off their queues)—about the past written by undergraduate students. Instructors at any university are welcome and encouraged to use the site in their courses.

Help type
section icon

Macromedia / Adobe Director PAD (Preservation, Access, Dissemination)

Posted by Leonardo Flores on January 5, 2012

I am a professor and researcher on electronic literature, and I'm interested in developing a critical edition of a work of electronic literature titled Arteroids (http://vispo.com/arteroids). This is an important work of electronic literature, written by Canadian poet and multimedia artist Jim Andrews initially with Macromedia Director 8 and later with upgraded versions up until reaching Adobe Director MX 2004 (version 10.1).

section icon

Poetess Archive

Posted by Laura Mandell on January 4, 2012

The Poetess Archive constitutes a resource for studying the literary history of popular British and American poetry. Much of it composed during what can be called the “bull market” of poetry's popularity(1), late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century popular poetry was often written in what came to be designated an "effeminate" style, whether written by men or women. Writings in the poetess tradition were disseminated in myriad collections: miscellanies, beauties, literary annuals, gift books. They achieved a place of prominence in virtually every middle-class household.

Help type
section icon

The Eighteenth-Century Common

Posted by Jessica Richard on January 4, 2012

I convene a faculty seminar in eighteenth-century studies that has been awarded a seed grant for 2012 from the Wake Forest University Humanities Institute to pursue external grants and develop The Eighteenth-Century Common, a web project that will provide a medium for eighteenth-century scholars to communicate with an eager public non-academic readership.

Pages