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Giacomo Leopardi's Zibaldone: a hypertext research platform

Posted by Silvia Stoyanova on January 11, 2012

Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837) is one of Italy’s most acclaimed poets and intellectuals, whose interpretation of the crisis of modernity gained him recognition already among his 19th century contemporaries Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but it was not until the publication of his intellectual diary, the Zibaldone, at the turn of the 20th century that Leopardi’s thought began to reveal its depths and to gather due critical attention.

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The Stockton Postcolonial Studies Project

Posted by Adeline Koh on January 10, 2012

The Stockton Postcolonial Studies Project is an ongoing digital research project that explores different theoretical arenas within postcolonial studies. “Postcolonial Studies” encapsulates a series of theories and methodologies that have impacted disciplines as diverse as history, literature, anthropology, sociology and political economics. Its roots stem from an intellectual imperative to radically reinterpret the histories, cultures and representation of formerly colonized peoples, a call pioneered in the 1980s by critics such as Edward Said, V.Y.

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The Comics Grid

Posted by Ernesto Priego on January 9, 2012

The Comics Grid is a collaborative, peer-edited online academic journal dedicated to comics scholarship. Its purpose is to make original contributions to the field of comics scholarship and to advance the appreciation of comic art within academia and the general cultural mediascape. Our ISSN is 2048-0792.

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The DigiBahn Project

Posted by David Neville on January 5, 2012

The Digital Bahnhof (DigiBahn) Project is an interdisciplinary software development initiative seeking to program a 3D digital game-based learning environment for the teaching of the German language, vocabulary, and culture to beginning university and advanced high school students.

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American Studier--Online resource for American Studies

Posted by Ben Railton on January 5, 2012

American Studier is an online resource and nexus for all students and scholars of American culture, history, literature, and more. It's still very much in development, and any and all collaborators and ideas (for content, for additional pages and focal points, for your own American Studies work and resources) will be very welcome.

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Electronic Book Review

Posted by Eric Dean Rasmussen on January 4, 2012

Electronic Book Review (ebr) is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal of critical writing produced and published by the emergent digital literary network. ebr threads include essays addressing a wide range of topics across the arts, sciences, and humanities. Our editors are particularly interested in critically savvy, in-depth work addressing the digital future of literature, theory, criticism, and the arts.

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The Eighteenth-Century Common

Posted by Jessica Richard on January 4, 2012

I convene a faculty seminar in eighteenth-century studies that has been awarded a seed grant for 2012 from the Wake Forest University Humanities Institute to pursue external grants and develop The Eighteenth-Century Common, a web project that will provide a medium for eighteenth-century scholars to communicate with an eager public non-academic readership.

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Mapping Modernism / Modernist Letters Project

Posted by Gabriel Hankins on January 2, 2012

This project, currently under development, is developing social and spatial maps of modernist correspondence, with a specific initial focus on the Bloomsbury Group and global modernism. Supported by the Scholars' Lab R&D Group at the University of Virginia, as well as collaborators in Library Science and twentieth-century literary studies, the project employs Omeka's collaborative data collection features alongside the exciting new visualization tool Neatline, due to be released soon.

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The Intermedial Zoom

Posted by Florentina Armaselu on November 17, 2011

The project focuses on the technique of zoom and its approaches across different media, from a comparative perspective. We are interested to compare the particularities of zooming in cartography, photography, film and textual materials, trying to identify patterns of expressivity on the level of meaning, aesthetic and cognitive reflection, and their possible uses in creating new digital paradigms.

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SceneDEX - American Music Scenes Index

Posted by Micah Vandegrift on November 17, 2011

This is a project that has not been started yet. It is a personal and academic interest of mine, and I'd like to gather a group of collaborators to get it started. There are plenty of archives that already exist that hold these sorts of objects and materials - I'd like to create a webspace to cull these collections and provide a way for materials to be submitted, organized and archived.

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