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The Comics Grid

Posted by Ernesto Priego on January 9, 2012

The Comics Grid is a collaborative, peer-edited online academic journal dedicated to comics scholarship. Its purpose is to make original contributions to the field of comics scholarship and to advance the appreciation of comic art within academia and the general cultural mediascape. Our ISSN is 2048-0792.

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Electronic Book Review

Posted by Eric Dean Rasmussen on January 4, 2012

Electronic Book Review (ebr) is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal of critical writing produced and published by the emergent digital literary network. ebr threads include essays addressing a wide range of topics across the arts, sciences, and humanities. Our editors are particularly interested in critically savvy, in-depth work addressing the digital future of literature, theory, criticism, and the arts.

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Mapping Modernism / Modernist Letters Project

Posted by Gabriel Hankins on January 2, 2012

This project, currently under development, is developing social and spatial maps of modernist correspondence, with a specific initial focus on the Bloomsbury Group and global modernism. Supported by the Scholars' Lab R&D Group at the University of Virginia, as well as collaborators in Library Science and twentieth-century literary studies, the project employs Omeka's collaborative data collection features alongside the exciting new visualization tool Neatline, due to be released soon.

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Guide to Evagrius Ponticus

Posted by Joel Kalvesmaki on December 9, 2011

The Guide to Evagrius Ponticus provides definitive lists of Evagrius's works, of editions and translations of those works, and of studies related to his life and thought. The Guide includes an inventory of relevant ancient sources that refer to Evagrius and a display of imagery from the ancient world. Updated quarterly, the Guide will gradually introduce a manuscript checklist, images of manuscripts, transcriptions of those manuscripts, and open source critical editions of Evagrius's writings.

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Athena Ruby

Posted by Joel Kalvesmaki on November 14, 2011

Athena Ruby is a font for scholarly editions of Byzantine inscriptions, particularly those where transcribing the visual typology of the letters and symbols is critical, such as in seals and coins.

The glyph set covers the major ideal types of letterforms, ligatures, punctuation, and symbols found in inscriptions from the Byzantine cultural ambit, fourth through the fifteenth century. It currently supports the Latin and Greek alphabets.

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Progetto Sonzogno

Posted by Silvia Valisa on November 13, 2011

This is a rough introduction to my inventory and analysis project for the production of Italian publisher Sonzogno between 1800 and 1943.
The data now available on the site consists of two Outlook Databases. They list the holdings of the Biblioteca Storica Sonzogno as inventoried by two archivists for the Italian publisher RCS, who is the current owner of the Sonzogno catalogue.

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Alcott Archive

Posted by Gregory Eiselein on November 13, 2011

We are interested in the creation of an online "Alcott Archive," a site for scholarly editions of the works of Louisa May Alcott, for personal papers related to Alcott and her circle (including her father Bronson), for scholarship and reference related to the study of Alcott, her writings, career and cultural context. The site would be a one-stop location to access all of Alcott's texts from the well-known (such as Little Women) to the recently re-discovered or uncollected or out-of-print.

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ELMCIP Knowledge Base

Posted by Eric Dean Rasmussen on November 12, 2011

ELMCIP's Electronic Literature Knowledge Base is a open acess research resource documenting activity in the field of electronic literature. It provides cross-referenced, contextualized information about authors, creative works, critical writing, and practices. The ELMCIP Knowledge Base depends on the active participation of a community of international researchers and writers working in and around the digital literary arts.

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Arab Film Heritage Project

Posted by Matthew Epler on November 12, 2011

We have found over 800 cans of film in Amman, Jordan! With a small grant from King Abdullah, we were able to digitize 10 of them and found some very interesting content. The most exciting find was a film produced in Palestine in 1968, just after the Six-Day war. It has been confirmed by scholars and persons affiliated with the PLO that this film is the only surviving copy from what was the PLO film archive before it disappeared in 1985.

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