Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)

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Digitisation of the dictionary of the Irish language

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project (2003-07) set out to digitise and publish the complete contents of the Royal Irish Academy’s Dictionary of the Irish Language (DIL). The Dictionary has been an invaluable tool to scholars and students since its publication in twenty-three separate fasciculi between 1913 and 1976 but the difficulties in using the paper edition are widely recognised.

Academic field
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Encoding an On-Line Electronic Scholarly Edition and Implementing an XML Prototype

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project aimed to program an on-line scholarly edition and implement an XML prototype meeting MLA’s guidelines for the electronic scholarly edition, and presenting full-text versions of all renditions to show evolution of a text to final states and devolution to original states. The first stage was to prepare a scholarly edition of William Wells Brown’s novel Clotel which provides the full text of all extant versions (those of 1853, 1860, 1864, and 1867) with explanatory annotation, textual-variant notes, and a scholarly apparatus.

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The Newton Manuscript Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Newton Manuscript Project began in January 2000 with a view to preparing 20 print volumes of Newton's non-scientific papers. Although we had stated in the initial application that that we would make the text of the proposed print edition available online, we quickly realised that the online environment now offered extraordinary and unrivalled possibilities for disseminating high quality scholarly output to a variety of audiences. Accordingly, we switched our primary focus to producing an electronic edition of Newton’s non-scientific papers.

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A trial electronic edition of the Preface to 'Ancrene Wisse' for the Early English Text Society

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project involved the development of a trial electronic edition of a short Middle English work, the 'Preface' to the thirteenth-century rule for recluses 'Ancrene Wisse', in conjunction with the Humanities Computing Development Team at Oxford, to work out an 'EETS template' which could serve as a model for electronic versions of future EETS editions. Since this is a prose work (the great majority of electronic editions of Middle English works are of verse texts) surviving in several manuscripts, it constituted a relatively demanding project.

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Hofmeister XIX

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Research on 19th-century music is hampered by insufficient bibliographical control of printed music. However, the Leipzig publisher Hofmeister published monthly or bi-monthly reports (Monatsberichte) on music publications that permit datings of large numbers of prints after 1829 when the series began: these constitute the single largest inventory of music prints produced in the 19th century. The Monatsberichte are limited by the form in which they were set out and by the fact that no single run of the series exists anywhere in the world.

Academic field
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Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech (SCOTS)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

SCOTS uses computer technology and the web to bring a unique electronic collection of Scots and Scottish English texts to scholars and the public. The resource contains written and spoken material, the latter with online audio/video clips, stored in a database along with extensive metadata. Linguists can investigate where particular words and phrases are used, and by whom. Displayed alongside the texts is a range of information about authors and speakers, so that it is possible to search for, e.g., “audio clips featuring Ayrshire women under 40”.

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John Ruskin's Teaching Collections

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This two-year project presented via the Web, a fully searchable and browsable catalogue linked to digitized images of John Ruskin's 'Teaching Collections' held in the Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford. The interface presents users with a means of linking Ruskin's original catalogues of his collection with modern catalogue information, presenting the entire Oxford-based collection as a single resource: as some of the original collections have now been dispersed under individual artist categories, the project virtually reassembled them in Ruskin's original sequences.

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