South Asia (Pakistan to Indonesia)

section icon

Representing and enacting knowledge about producing Tibetan text-critical editions

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aimed to advance our understanding of the processes of the textual criticism and editing of canonical and other Classical Tibetan texts - including the basic task of rendering them readable at all. These mainly ancient materials are undoubtedly of the very highest possible scholarly interest, but without intensive modern scholarship in most instances remain partially or completely incomprehensible because of accumulated errors in copying, as they have been for many centuries.

section icon

Wa dictionary and internet database for minority languages of Burma

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The SOAS Wa Dictionary Project is a three-year effort (2003-2006), funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board to produce a high-quality dictionary, translating Wa into Chinese, Burmese/Myanmar and English. The project uses advanced techniques in corpus-based lexicography, centred on a database and Internet resource, which will also be suitable for other languages spoken in Burma/Myanmar besides Wa after the life of the project.
Aims and Objectives

The academic objectives of this project are

Academic field
section icon

Fully descriptive analytic catalogue of the Waddell Manuscripts NGB (including miniatur paintings & other artwork)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The Rig 'dzin Tshe dbang nor bu edition of the rNying ma'i rgyud 'bum is a beautifully illustrated set of manuscripts, originally in thirty-three volumes, thirty volumes of which survive. It represents an important collection of Tibetan Buddhist tantric scriptures, once with many witnesses, but now with only a handful of extant editions. Of all the surviving editions, the Rig 'dzin Tshe dbang nor bu edition is the most lavishly produced, manufactured from good materials, finely decorated, and illustrated with many high quality hand-painted miniatures.

section icon

Buddhist Death Rituals of Southeast Asia and China

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Aims and objectives

We aim to establish a pattern of text and ritual for the Theravada countries of South and Southeast Asia concentrating on the death rites. In doing so we will accomplish the following objectives (listed according to project phases)

1.1 to compile a comprehensive bibliography of secondary literature on Theravada Buddhist death rituals in Southeast Asia
1.2 to define the parameters of research on Buddhist death rituals

section icon

The Historical Study and Documentation of the Pad Gling Traditions in Bhutan

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This research project aims to undertake a historical study of the Pad gling tradition and its establishments, focusing on the three principal institutions of Pad gling reincarnations: the Pad gling gSung spruls, who are considered reincarnations of Padma Gling pa himself and were based in lHa lung in Tibet and gTam zhing in Bhutan; the lHa lung Thugs sras, who are incarnations of Padma Glingpa’s son Zla ba rGyal mtshan (b.1499); and the sGang steng sPrul sku, who are considered reincarnations of Padma Gling pa’s grandson Padma 'Phrin las (1564-1642?).

section icon

Early historic landscapes and the rise of centralised states on the Mekong Delta, Cambodia

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Mekong River delta region was a hearth of early state development in SE Asia. Archaeological research at the early historic city of Angkor Borei, Cambodia, is revealing the nature of the cultural landscape, but this information is yet to be articulated with records of change and variability in the ‘natural’ landscape.

Academic field
section icon

Digitisation of the South Asian oral history archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Centre of South Asian Studies won a Resource Enhancement Grant from the AHRC to begin the digitisation of its oral history collections. There are around 300 recordings in this collection, mostly held on audio cassette, with some reel-to-reel tape recordings as well. The project was completed in 2009 - the interviews, transcripts and various search functions are now available on the Centre of South Asian Studies' website.

Academic field
section icon

From subjects to citizens: society and the everyday state in North India and Pakistan, 1947-1964

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This research project is a three-year collaboration between the universities of Leeds and Royal Holloway which is studying the interaction between state and citizen immediately before and in the two decades following India and Pakistan’s independence in 1947. The website contains downloadable podcasts of interviews, a bibliography, links to archives and a mailing list. To date, research has concentrated on the politics high levels of government, and little work has been done on the impact of independence and partition on everyday life.

Academic field
section icon

Digital Himalaya Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Digital Himalaya project was designed by Professor Alan Macfarlane and Dr Mark Turin as a strategy for archiving and making available valuable ethnographic materials from the Himalayan region. The Digital Himalaya project had three primary objectives:

1. to preserve in a digital medium archival anthropological materials from the Himalayan region that were quickly degenerating in their current forms, including films in various formats, still photographs, sound recordings, field notes, maps and rare journals

Academic field
section icon

Hidden Histories of Exploration: Exhibiting Geographical Collections

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project considers the role played by indigenous peoples and intermediaries in the history of exploration, as revealed by research in the collections of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). The project is particularly concerned with the roles of guides, porters, pilots, cooks, carriers, interpreters, go-betweens and informants in the creation of geographical knowledge. In wider terms, it seeks to provide a model for new ways of working with well-established geographical collections.

Pages