Sociolinguistics

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"Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin": Migration as a Prism for Viewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Northern Ireland

Posted by Karen Corrigan on April 3, 2015

A majority of research on language in Nothern Ireland (NI) has focused on deepening our understanding of the history and contemporary diversity of the languages and dialects spoken by the major ethnic groups (Roman Catholics and Protestants). There have been heated debates surrounding the linguistic heritages of these communities (Irish Gaelic and Ulster Scots) and the scholarly focus reflects aspects of the social conflict endured by its population for much of the twentieth century.

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The Empire Speaks Back: Northern Irish English as a Post-Colonial Dialect

Posted by Karen Corrigan on April 3, 2015

There has been a resurgence of interest in English dialects within academia & outside it. The former is due to a greater focus on dialect within linguistic theory. It may also result from the wider availability of digital resources. Popular interest has been encouraged by BBC 'Voices' as well as a renewed political focus on the regions. There has also been pressure to recognise the validity of non-native Englishes & their literatures. The demands of these diverse audiences have been met by popular books & authoritative works.

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A 'Time-Capsule' for the Google Generation: The Diachronic Electronic Corpus of Tyneside English

Posted by Karen Corrigan on April 3, 2015

DECTE is an amalgamation of the existing Newcastle Electronic Corpus of Tyneside English (NECTE) created between 2001 and 2005 (http://research.ncl.ac.uk/necte), and NECTE2, a collection of interviews conducted in the Tyneside area since 2007. It thereby constitutes a rare example of a publicly available on-line corpus presenting dialect material spanning five decades.