Microsoft Excel Worksheet (XLS)

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South Cadbury Environs Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project is a multiperiod survey of the landscape within a 64 sq km centred on the Iron Age and Post Roman hillfort of Cadbury Castle, Somerset. Sampling localities and transects cover approximately 11 sq km of the study area.
The principal survey techniques have been gradiometry, test and shovel pitting, the first two applied uniformly over all target areas, the latter were soil conditions are suitable. Excavation is then used to test the results and to further the narrative objectives.

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Silchester insula IX

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's aim is the capture, storage and manipulation of data from a long-term archaeological excavation (1997 and continuing) of insula ix of the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester, Hampshire (Calleva Atrebatum). The data comprise a variety of linked excavation and finds records which are stored on the Integrated Archaeological Database (IADB). The latter is a key tool for the post-excavation analysis of this complex, stratified site for which publication is planned in both printed and web-based formats.

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The History of the Chinese Maritime Customs Service (1854 - 1949)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"Building on earlier collaborations with historians at Cambridge University and the Second Historical Archives of China, this 2003-07 AHRC-funded project is designed to further understandings of the modern Chinese state, British imperial history, and the history of modern globalization in China, by focusing on the role the Chinese Maritime Customs Service and its staff played in these historical processes.

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Technologies of Enchantment: Celtic Art in Southern Britain in the Middle and Late Iron Age

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project aims to investigate the artefacts found in Britain between about 300 BC and 150 AD which have come to be known as ‘Celtic Art’. The project seeks to understand why Celtic Art objects were made in the first place, how they were used and why they often seem to have been intentionally deposited in rivers or under the ground. The first task has been to compile a comprehensive database (in Excel, downloadable from the website) of all Celtic Art ever found in Britain.

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Why me? Artist's use of self image

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project created an alphabetically presented research database containing the names of over 340 artists worldwide who feature their own physical presence within the artworks they present. It is anticipated that this database will be of interest to artists, academics within the research community, the art media and art viewing public; specifically those interested in investigating and questioning cross cultural parallels between artist's use of self representation through diverse artistic practices.

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Magnetic moments in the past: Developing archaeomagnetic dating for application in UK archaeology

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project follows on from a previous collaboration which established a methodology for using measurements of the past magnetic field of the Earth for dating archaeological materials in the last 4000 years in the UK. The primary aim of this project is to realise the potential of this research by developing its practical application in UK archaeology. There is increasing interest in using archaeomagnetic dating as part of the suite of chronological tools available to archaeologists. However, it has yet to be adopted routinely.

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Documentation of endangered languages and cultures in the Nigeria-Cameroon borderland

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Nigeria-Cameroon borderland is one of the most linguistically diverse regions of the world, with many languages either near extinction or severely endangered. This project builds on previous work by the participants in surveying and documenting endangered languages in this region. One example is the language of the Somyewe, a small group of blacksmiths whose language and culture are on the verge of disappearing. Documentation of two other local languages will also be undertaken.

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