History

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Heurist Knowledge Management System

Posted by Ian Johnson on March 7, 2017

HEURIST is a flexible Open Source data management system which allows any confident researcher or data manager to design, create, manage, analyse and publish richly-structured database(s) within hours, through a simple web interface, without need of programmers or consultants. It is aimed at a broad range of Humanities data, characterised by rich text, multimedia, relationships, categorisation, uncertain data, spatial and temporal information, and the need to work collaboratively while maintaining access control. It allows incremental changes in database structure - existing data are not affected - allowing projects to start small and simple and evolve as the research develops.

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The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project

Posted by Sarah Ketchley on January 19, 2017

Emma B. Andrews is best remembered for her association with the millionaire lawyer turned archaeologist/art and antiquities collector, Theodore M. Davis. Traveling to Egypt with him between 1889 and 1912, she kept detailed journals of these voyages along the Nile, including his important yet under-reported excavations of 20 significant tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Emma provides a vital commentary on the archaeology and pioneering Egyptologists of the time.

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The Prague Spring Archive

Posted by Ian Goodale on January 5, 2017

The University of Texas at Austin Libraries have partnered with the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and the University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies to digitize archival materials from the LBJ Presidential Archive’s collections and make them accessible via a portal created with Scalar. 

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China Biographical Database

Posted by Lik Hang Tsui on July 21, 2016

The China Biographical Database is a freely accessible relational database with biographical information about approximately 370,000 individuals as of 2016, primarily from the 7th through 19th centuries. With both online and offline versions, the data is meant to be useful for statistical, social network, and spatial analysis as well as serving as a kind of biographical reference. 

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The Digital Sigillography Resource

Posted by John McEwan on July 5, 2016

The Digitial Sigillography Resource (Digisig) enables scholars and members of the public to search sigillographic datasets provided by researchers, archives and museums. Digisig fosters the study of seals, particular from Medieval Europe, by radically enhancing access to this important cultural legacy. Digisig aims to make seals and their associated scholarship discoverable.

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Apprenticeship in Early Modern Venice: the Garzoni project

Posted by Maud Ehrmann on April 1, 2016

Led by an interdisciplinary consortium, the Garzoni project undertakes the study of apprenticeship, work and society in early modern Venice by focusing on a specific archival source, namely the `Accordi dei Garzoni' from the Venetian State Archives. The project revolves around two main phases with, in the first instance, the design and the development of tools to extract and render information contained in the documents (according to Semantic Web standards) and, as a second step, the examination of such information.

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Old Testament, New Tricks: Using Biblical Translation to Examine Word Sense and Popular Belief

Posted by Zach Bleemer on March 27, 2016

This project presents a novel framework and empirical technique using digital tools and a small but highly-structured dataset--namely, 14 translations of the Old Testament--to analyze latent beliefs regarding beautiful objects across three broadly-defined populations: 16th century Great Britain, 20th century Germany, and the contemporary United States.

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Dissenting Academies Online: Database and Encyclopedia 1660-1860

Posted by Isabel Rivers on April 14, 2015

The Database and Encyclopedia is a major digital resource for the study of the dissenting academies in the British Isles from 1660 to 1860. When complete it will contain historical accounts of individual academies, biographical articles about leading tutors, and biographical data for thousands of students educated at the academies over two centuries. It also provides the most comprehensive guide to archival sources for the study of dissenting academies ever created. Academy history articles provide authoritative institutional histories based on primary sources.

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Private Books for Educational Use - the Formation of the Northern Congregational College Library

Posted by Isabel Rivers on April 14, 2015

The Northern Congregational College Project makes available in digital form the Catalogue of the Library of the Lancashire Independent College, Manchester (1885) and details of the 2,400 surviving books from the library of the Northern Congregational College, formed in 1958 from the amalgamation of two major Congregational colleges founded in the nineteenth century, Lancashire Independent College and Yorkshire United Independent College. In 1984 the Northern Congregational College became Northern College (United Reformed and Congregational).

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Programming Historian

Posted by fred Gibbs on March 30, 2015

The Programming Historian is an online, open access, peer reviewed suite of over 30 tutorials that help humanists (though slanted towards historians) learn a wide range of digital tools, techniques, and workflows to facilitate their research. Despite the name, we do not focus exclusively on programming, but rather aim to provide guidance on a variety of digital methods and approaches.

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