Archaeology

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Heurist Knowledge Management System

Posted by Ian Johnson on March 7, 2017

HEURIST is a flexible Open Source data management system which allows any confident researcher or data manager to design, create, manage, analyse and publish richly-structured database(s) within hours, through a simple web interface, without need of programmers or consultants. It is aimed at a broad range of Humanities data, characterised by rich text, multimedia, relationships, categorisation, uncertain data, spatial and temporal information, and the need to work collaboratively while maintaining access control. It allows incremental changes in database structure - existing data are not affected - allowing projects to start small and simple and evolve as the research develops.

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The Digital Sigillography Resource

Posted by John McEwan on July 5, 2016

The Digitial Sigillography Resource (Digisig) enables scholars and members of the public to search sigillographic datasets provided by researchers, archives and museums. Digisig fosters the study of seals, particular from Medieval Europe, by radically enhancing access to this important cultural legacy. Digisig aims to make seals and their associated scholarship discoverable.

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Classical Archaeology and Art on the Web: the Beazley Archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The original project, a database of Athenian figure-decorated pottery 626-300BC, began in 1979. It was the second in the University of Oxford to be available 'on line' (after Cairns Science Library). From 1992 that database, and others begun from the early 1990s, began to be prepared for migration to the web. The project funded by the AHRB 2003/6 represented the first stage of an integrated multiple database system available on the web; more than 20 databases were programmed into XDB during 2004. Also during 2002/4 the digitisation of Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum for the web was undertaken.

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Palaeopathology and the origins and evolution of horse husbandry

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

A collaborative, interdisciplinary project, rooted in archaeology and employing veterinary science to identify osteological differences between riding, traction and free-living horses, resulting from their different life-ways, in order to further our understanding of the origins and evolution of horse husbandry. Two analytical methods are employed:

Academic field
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Reassessing ancient Egyptian crops, crop husbandry and the agrarian landscape

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The main focus of the project is to provide a well-integrated reassessment of the diversity, distribution and use of Egyptian crops, crop husbandry and the agrarian landscape through the systematic compilation and analysis of Egyptian archaeobotanical data which will also be integrated with the textual, artistic and ethnohistorical evidence for crops and other species in order to create a more powerful methodology for understanding the complex processes of ancient Egyptian agriculture than the use of any single source of evidence alone.

Academic field
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Papers of Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806 - 1859)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The University of Bristol, UK, holds over 33,000 pages in the Brunel Collection. This collection contains the personal papers of the Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, a key figure in the Industrial Revolution. However, despite its importance as a scholarly resource, no electronic catalogue of the collection exists and physical access is limited. In 2003 the University was awarded an AHRB resource enhancement grant to carry out a pilot digitization project to bring this resource to a wider audience via the Internet.

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The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI) is an evolving electronic archive of British and Irish Romanesque stone sculpture.

ROMANESQUE SCULPTURE

Romanesque sculpture marks a high point of artistic production in Britain and Ireland, corresponding to the boom in high-quality building that followed the Norman Conquest in 1066, and reflecting a new set of links with mainland Europe. A good deal of this sculpture remains in parish churches and cathedrals, houses and halls, castles and museums throughout these isles.

PRESERVATION

Academic field
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The British archaeological expedition to the ancient emporium at Vetren-Pistiros, central Bulgaria

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project consists of preliminary geophysical prospection (1999-2001), a programme of limited excavation (30 sq metres), accompanied by faunal, organic, and metallurgical analyses (1999-2008), whose aim is to create a continuous, dated sequence of activities at the late Iron Age river port at Adjiyska Vodenitsa, near Vetren, plausibly identified with ancient Pistiros.

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The Medieval Palace of Westminster Research Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Overview of the Project. The Westminster Palace Research Project is an inter-disciplinary study, combining archaeology, history, architectural history, and new uses of information technology. Its aim is to produce a comprehensive architectural study of the medieval palace and its place in the broader context of historic palaces. Equally important is the fact that the innovative techniques to be used will be transferable to the study of other historic buildings, and thus the project has implications beyond Westminster.

Academic field

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