Eastern Europe

section icon

The Notion 'Possible Word' and its Limits: a typology of suppletion

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

While linguists have investigated the notions ‘possible human language’ and ‘possible sentence’, less has been done to establish the bounds of possibility for the word. As part of continuing research into inflectional morphology, we intend to explore one of these boundaries, where different inflectional forms are not related phonologically. An example is Russian čelovek ‘person’, which has the plural ljud-i, a typical instance of suppletion. Suppletion is found in many inflecting languages and involves extremely frequent words. As Carstairs-McCarthy shows, the phenomenon “increasingly ...

Academic field
section icon

Christianisation and state-formation in Northern and Central Europe c.900-c.1200

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

We analysed the connection between religious change (Christianisation) and political change (the development of centralised power) in Scandinavia, Central Europe and Rus'. In all these areas the final conversion to Christianity was initiated from above. Yet there were also significant differences between the regions in how Christianisation and monarchy were linked. We composed a detailed questionnaire and included history, archaeology and art history in our analysis. Our aims were to compare the various areas, looking at both the primary sources and the national literature.

Academic field
section icon

Access to Russian Music: Catalogue of published works: Serge Prokofiev Archive, Centre for Russian Music

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"The Serge Prokofiev Archive is the only archive in the world wholly dedicated to this composer. Established at Goldsmiths College in 1994, the Archive owes its existence to the initiative of Mme Lina Prokofiev, the composer's first wife, who set up the Serge Prokofiev Foundation (Charitable trust No. 326370), with the objective of furthering the knowledge and study of Prokofiev's life and work.

Academic field
section icon

The origin and spread of stock-keeping in the Near East and Europe

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

In western Eurasia we know that the earliest evidence for domestic farmyard animals occurs around 10,000 years ago. We also know that farming then spread westwards through Europe over the subsequent millennia, arriving in the far west and north of Europe some 6,000 years ago. For decades there have been major debates as to the nature of this spread, with many basic questions still remaining largely unanswered. The objective of this major research project, which has been funded for four years by the AHRC, is to address these questions.

Academic field
section icon

The reuniting of Osip Mandelstam's texts and archives in digital form

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This pilot project's objective was to digitize and deposit with the Oxford Text Archive the holdings of the State Russian Museum for Literature and the Arts, Moscow, and the Central Archive of the FSB (formerly KGB), Moscow, relating to the life and work of the poet Osip Mandelstam (1891-1938), generally considered the foremost Russian poet of the C20th. This was seen as a first step to the reuniting of his entire archive, scattered all over the world, in digital form, in order to afford free, universal access to scholars, students and poetry lovers world-wide.

Academic field
section icon

Around 1968: Activism, Networks, Trajectories

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is a study of militants, the networks they constructed and the trajectories they followed in Europe between 1965-75. It is a collective project, undertaken by 14 historians, 7 based in the UK, 7 outside. It is based on archival work and the collection of oral testimony from a sample of networks and activists involved in them in each country.

Academic field
section icon

Autonomous Morphology in Diachrony: comparative evidence from the Romance languages

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Romance verb reveals some seemingly nonsensical, but diachronically and geographically recurrent, patterns in its paradigmatic structure, which show remarkable diachronic robustness, self-reinforcement and self-replication. The recurrent but autonomously morphological structures presupposed by such changes furnish crucial diachronic corroboration for the notion of ‘morphomes’ as elaborated by M. Aronoff (Morphology By Itself 1994), and in general for the importance of ‘inferential-realizational’ strategies in acquisition and language change (see G. Stump Inflectional Morphology 2000).

Academic field

Pages