University of Reading

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Silchester insula IX

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's aim is the capture, storage and manipulation of data from a long-term archaeological excavation (1997 and continuing) of insula ix of the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester, Hampshire (Calleva Atrebatum). The data comprise a variety of linked excavation and finds records which are stored on the Integrated Archaeological Database (IADB). The latter is a key tool for the post-excavation analysis of this complex, stratified site for which publication is planned in both printed and web-based formats.

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The Medieval Palace of Westminster Research Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Overview of the Project. The Westminster Palace Research Project is an inter-disciplinary study, combining archaeology, history, architectural history, and new uses of information technology. Its aim is to produce a comprehensive architectural study of the medieval palace and its place in the broader context of historic palaces. Equally important is the fact that the innovative techniques to be used will be transferable to the study of other historic buildings, and thus the project has implications beyond Westminster.

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The Soldier in Later Medieval England

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

It has been argued that standing armies and professional soldiers were a phenomenon of the early modern state. There can be no doubt, however, that the period from 1369 to 1453 witnessed hundreds of thousands of soldiers in the pay of the crown. Although these dates themselves relate to the beginning and end of important phases in the war with France commonly known as the Hundred Years War, soldiers were dispatched for campaign and garrison service not only across the Channel, but also in the Iberian Peninsular, Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

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Henslowe Alleyn Digitisation Project (HADP )

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Edward Alleyn was the Elizabethan actor-manager who founded Dulwich College; with his father-in-law Philip Henslowe he ran several of the most successful acting companies of Shakespeare's time, including the Lord Admiral's Men, and expanded a number of London theatres, among them the Rose. The Henslowe-Alleyn Archive (held at at Dulwich College) consists of over 2000 pages of fragile manuscripts comprising the most important extant archive of material relating to drama and performance in the early modern period.

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Collected Works of Thomas Middleton

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Oxford Middleton, prepared by seventy-five scholars from a dozen countries, follows the precedent of The Oxford Shakespeare in being published in two volumes, an innovative but accessible Collected Works and a comprehensive scholarly Companion. Though closely connected, each volume can be used independently of the other.

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The excavation of WF16, a Pre-Pottery Neolithic A site in southern Jordan: acquiring new evidence for the origins of sedentary farming communities

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

WF16 is located in the spectacular Wadi Faynan area of Southern Jordan. The excavation will use a single context recording system (based on the MoLAS system) and will use a purpose built archaeological database (supplied by IADS York) to create an easily accessible site archive. Material remains at the site indicate that settlement occurred during the Pre Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) period, with a suite of radiocarbon dates indicating occupation between 11,600 and 10,200 BP.

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The role of shell middens in the Mesolithic settlement of Western Scotland and the transition to the Neolithic: A technological study of chipped stone

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The first people to live in Scotland arrived around 9000 years ago and lived by hunting and gathering within woodlands that had colonised the landscape after the end of the ice age and on the coasts where many resources including shellfish, fish, sea mammals and seaweed could be exploited. The principal type of Mesolithic evidence for archaeologists is the stone tools and the waste from their manufacture.

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The samian pottery industries of Roman Gaul

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Gaulish samian or sigillata was the principal type of tableware used in the western provinces of the Roman Empire, particularly in Britain, Gaul and Germany, between the 1st and the 3rd centuries AD and is found in the great majority of sites within the Empire. In order to produce a survey of this important evidence for industrialisation, the project will compile an online database of some 5,000 different potters and their associated die-stamps, 400,000 in total, produced over 250 years.

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